U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

President's Budget Request, NIDDK FY 2014

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES​
NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH 

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

2014 Budget

Print Version (PDF, 240Kb, 28 pages)

 

NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH
National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

For carrying out section 301 and title IV of the PHS Act with respect to diabetes and digestive and kidney disease, $1,811,786,000.

 

Amounts Available for Obligation (Dollars in thousands)

Source of Funding FY 2012 Actual FY 2013 CR FY 2014 PB
Appropriation 1,800,447 1,808,042 1,811,786
Type 1 Diabetes 2 150,000 150,000 150,000
Rescission -3,403 0 0
Supplemental 0 0 0
Subtotal, adjusted appropriation 1,947,044 1,958,042 1,961,786
Secretary's Transfer for Alzheimer Disease (AD) -1,184 0 0
Real transfer under Secretary's transfer authority -512 0 0
Comparative Transfers to NLM for NCBI and Public Access -1,642 -2,127 0
Subtotal, adjusted budget authority 1,943,706 1,955,915 1,961,786
Unobligated balance lapsing -59 0 0
Total obligations 1,943,647 1,955,915 1,961,786

1 Excludes the following amounts for reimbursable activities carried out by this account:
FY 2012 - $3,948 FY 2013 - $6,001 FY 2014 - $6,000
2 Type 1 Diabetes Special Statutory Authority in Accordance with P.L. 111-309, and P.L. 112-240.

 

Budget Mechanism - Total 1 (Dollars in thousands)

MECHANISM FY 2012 Actual No. FY 2012 Actual Amount FY 2013 CR No. FY 2013 CR Amount FY 2014 PB No. FY 2014 PB Amount Change vs. FY 2012 No. Change vs. FY 2012 Amount
Research Projects Grants Noncompeting 2,105 $854,549 1,954 $837,947 1,750 $809,025 -355 -$45,524
Research Projects Grants Administrative Supplements -108 12,524 -110 13,000 -110 13,000 -2 $476
Research Projects Grants Competing - Renewal 200 84,178 192 80,954 226 95,091 26 10,913
Research Projects Grants Competing - New 381 169,067 434 191,951 431 190,985 50 21,918
Research Projects Grants Competing - Supplements 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Subtotal, Research Project Grants: Competing 581 $253,245 626 $272,905 657 $286,076 76 $32,831
Subtotal, Research Project Grants (RPGs) 2,686 $1,120,318 2,580 $1,123,852 2,407 $1,108,101 -279 -$12,217
Research Project Grants: SBIR/STTR 85 45,383 90 46,309 96 48,632 11 3,249
Research Project Grants 2,771 $1,165,701 2,670 $1,170,161 2,503 $1,156,733 -268 -$8,968
Research Centers: Specialized/Comprehensive 97 101,430 98 102,742 98 103,601 1 2,171
Research Centers in Clinical Research 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Research Centers in Biotechnology 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Research Centers in Comparative Medicine 0 547 0 547 0 547 0 0
Research Centers in Minority Institutions 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Research Centers 97 $101,977 98 $103,289 98 $104,148 1 $2,171
Other Research: Research Careers 486 73,091 490 75,210 490 76,210 4 3,119
Other Research: Cancer Education 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Other Research: Cooperative Clinical Research 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Other Research: Biomedical Research Support 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Other Research: Minority Biomedical Research Support 0 336 0 336 0 336 0 0
Other Research: Other 106 51,966 106 54,966 106 54,966 0 3,000
Other Research 592 $125,393 596 $130,512 596 $131,512 4 $6,119
Total Research Grants 3,460 $1,393,071 3,364 $1,403,962 3,197 $1,392,393 -263 -$678
Research Training: Individual 261 (FTTPs) 11,924 261 (FTTPs) 12,000 261 (FTTPs) 12,250 0 (FTTPs) 326
Research Training: Institutional 895 (FTTPs) 46,708 895 (FTTPs) 47,000 895 (FTTPs) 48,400 0 (FTTPs) 1,692
Total Research Training 1,156 (FTTPs) $58,632 1,156 (FTTPs) $59,000 1,156 (FTTPs) $60,650 0 (FTTPs) $2,018
Research & Development Contracts 144 96,429 145 97,379 145 113,169 1 16,740
Research & Development Contracts SBIR/STTR (non-add) -6 -395 -6 -1,200 -6 -1,200 0 805
Intramural Research 335 (FTEs) 179,580 335 (FTEs) 179,580 352 (FTEs) 179,580 17 (FTEs) 0
Research Management and Support 285 (FTEs) 65,994 324 (FTEs) 65,994 307 (FTEs) 65,994 22 (FTEs) 0
Construction 0 0 0 0
Buildings and Facilities 0 0 0 0
Total, NIDDK 620 $1,793,706 659 $1,805,915 659 $1,811,786 39 $18,080

1 All items in italics are "non-adds"

 

Budget Mechanism - Type 1 Diabetes 1 (Dollars in thousands)

MECHANISM FY 2012 Actual No. FY 2012 Actual Amount FY 2013 CR No. FY 2013 CR Amount FY 2014 PB No. FY 2014 PB Amount Change vs. FY 2012 No. Change vs. FY 2012 Amount
Research Project​ Grants: Noncompeting 29 $29,571 25 $35,834 56 $54,934 27 $25,363
Research Project Grants: Administrative Supplements -2 1,114 -2 1,100 -2 1,100 0 -14
Research Project Grants: Competing Renewal 2 7,743 0 0 0 0 -2 -7,742
Research Project Grants: Competing New 23 102,410 23 101,435 19 82,383 -4 -20,027
Research Project Grants: Competing Supplements 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Subtotal, Research Project Grants: Competing 25 $110,153 23 $101,435 19 $82,383 -6 -$27,770
Subtotal, Research Project Grants (RPGs) 54 $140,838 48 $138,369 75 $138,417 21 -$2,421
Research Project Grants: SBIR/STTR 15 4,113 20 4,541 19 4,761 4 648
Research Project Grants 69 $144,951 68 $142,910 94 $143,178 25 -$1,773
Research Centers: Specialized/Comprehensive 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Research Centers in Clinical Research 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Research Centers in Biotechnology 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Research Centers in Comparative Medicine 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Research Centers in Minority Institutions 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Research Centers 0 $0 0 $0 0 $0 0 $0
Other Research: Research Careers 6 2,642 7 2,990 6 2,597 0 -45
Other Research: Cancer Education 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Other Research: Cooperative Clinical Research 0 2,000 0 2,000 0 2,000 0 0
Other Research: Biomedical Research Support 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Other Research: Minority Biomedical Research Support 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Other Research: Other 1 71 3 1,000 3 1,000 2 929
Other Research 7 $4,712 10 $5,990 9 $5,597 2 $885
Total Research Grants 76 $149,663 78 $148,900 103 $148,775 27 -$888
Research Training Individual 0 (FTTPs) 0 0 (FTTPs) 0 0 (FTTPs) 0 0 (FTTPs) 0
Research Training Institutional 6 (FTTPs) 337 8 (FTTPs) 1,100 8 (FTTPs) 1,225 2 (FTTPs) 888
Total Research Training 6 (FTTPs) $337 8 (FTTPs) $1,100 8 (FTTPs) $1,225 2 (FTTPs) $888
Research & Development Contracts 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
SBIR/STTR (non-add) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Intramural Research 0 (FTEs) 0 0 (FTEs) 0 0 (FTEs) 0 0 (FTEs) 0
Research Management and Support 0 (FTEs) 0 0 (FTEs) 0 0 (FTEs) 0 0 (FTEs) 0
Construction 0 0 0 0
Buildings and Facilities 0 0 0 0
Total, TYPE 1 0 $150,000 0 $150,000 0 $150,000 0 $0

1 All items in italics are "non-adds"

 

Major Changes in the Fiscal Year 2014 President’s Budget Request

Major changes by budget mechanism and/or budget activity detail are briefly described below. Note that there may be overlap between budget mechanisms and activity detail and these highlights will not sum to the total change for the FY 2014 President’s Budget for NIDDK, which is $18.1 million more than the FY 2012 level, for a total of $1,961.8 million.

Research Project Grants (RPGs; -$9.0 million; total $1,156.7 million): NIDDK will continue to support competing RPGs—657 awards in FY 2014, an increase of 76 from FY 2012. About 1,750 noncompeting RPGs, totaling $822.0 million, will also be made in FY 2014.

Studies of Diet-Host-Microbiome Interactions in Autoimmune and Metabolic Diseases (+$10.0 million; total $10.0 million): This new initiative will broadly address autoimmune diseases and metabolic conditions.

Collaborative Research Network on Disease Modeling and Tissue Repair and Regeneration (+$9.0 million; total $9.0 million): This new initiative focuses on determining the biological and physical requirements for the development of functional organ systems.

Personalized Healthcare for Diabetes and Other NIDDK Diseases in the Era of Genomic Medicine (+$5.0 million; total $5.0 million): This initiative will pursue research targeting anti-diabetic medications and a pharmacogenomic study of metformin.

Advancing Translational Research in the Reversal of Organ Fibrosis (+$3.0 million; total $3.0 million): This new initiative will conduct translational research that targets organ fibrosis.

Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery Consortium (-$4.5 million; total $0.0 million). This consortium to facilitate coordinated clinical, epidemiological, and behavioral research in the field of bariatric surgery, is ending in FY 2014 as scheduled.

Childhood Liver Disease Research and Education Network (-$6.7 million; total $0.0 million): The network to establish a database of clinical information and tissue samples from children with various forms of liver disease, is ending in FY 2014 as scheduled.

HALT-Polycystic Kidney Disease Consortium (-$4.3 million; total $0.0 million): This consortium established to design and implement clinical trials of treatments that might slow renal function loss in polycystic kidney disease, is ending in FY 2014 as scheduled.

 

Summary of Changes

(Dollars in thousands)

FY 2012 Actual :                         $1,793,706
FY 2014 President’s Budget:      $1,811,786

Net Change:                                $18,080

​Built-in CHANGES
2014 President’s Budget FTEs
2014 President’s Budget Authority
Change from FY 2012 FTEs
Change from FY 2012 Budget Authority
Intramural Research: Annualization of March 2013 pay increase and benefits (1a) $73,376 $186
Intramural Research: January FY 2014 pay increase and benefits (1b) 73,376 511
Intramural Research: One more day of pay (1c) 73,376 265
Intramural Research: Differences attributable to change in FTE (1d) 73,376 0
Intramural Research: Payment for centrally furnished services (1e) 31,894 573
Intramural Research: Increased cost of laboratory supplies, materials, other expenses, and non-recurring costs (1f) 74,310 265
Subtotal $1,800
Research Management and Support: Annualization of March 2013 pay increase and benefits (2a) $41,500 $128
Research Management and Support: January FY 2014 pay increase and benefits (2b) 41,500 324
Research Management and Support: One more day of pay (2c) 41,500 165
Research Management and Support: Differences attributable to change in FTE (2d) 41,500 0
Research Management and Support: Payment for centrally furnished services (2e) 3,910 70
Research Management and Support: Increased cost of laboratory supplies, materials other expenses, and non-recurring costs (2f) 20,584 4
Subtotal $691
Subtotal, Built-in $2,491

In 2014, NIDDK will establish several multidisciplinary projects focused on studying the interaction of diet, host, and gut microbiome (collection of microorganisms including bacteria) with an initiative entitled “Diet-Host-Microbiome Interactions in Autoimmune and Metabolic Diseases.” The research will involve both humans and animal models, and will broadly address: 1) autoimmune diseases such as type 1 diabetes, celiac disease, inflammatory bowel diseases, autoimmune liver diseases, and some forms of chronic kidney disease; and 2) metabolic conditions including obesity, type 2 diabetes and NASH. In 2014, with an initiative entitled “A Collaborative Research Network on Disease Modeling and Tissue Repair and Regeneration,” NIDDK will establish a network that focuses on determining the biological and physical requirements for development of functional organ systems that could be used to model diseases or serve as the basis for tissue repair and regeneration therapies. Recently, NIDDK supported basic science research has uncovered new knowledge and developed a disease model system; tools necessary to advance our efforts to treat and prevent disease. A newly identified muscle hormone called irisin, boosts the body’s energy expenditure in a mouse model, and suggests a potential new therapeutic approach for addressing obesity and type 2 diabetes.​

 

Summary of Changes... continued
​Program CHANGES
2014 President’s Budget No.
2014 President’s Budget Amount
Change from FY 2012 No.
Change from FY 2012 Amount
Research Project Grants: (1)
Research Project Grants: Noncompeting (1a) 1,750 $822,025 -355 -$45,048
Research Project Grants: Competing (1b) 657 286,076 76 32,831
Research Project Grants: SBIR/STTR (1c) 96 48,632 11 3,249
Research Project Grants: Total 2,503 $1,156,733 -268 -$8,968
Research Centers (2) 98 $104,148 1 $2,171
Other Research (3) 596 131,512 4 6,119
Research Training (4) 1,156 60,650 0 2,018
Research and development contracts (5) 145 113,169 1 16,740
Subtotal, Extramural $1,566,212 $18,080
 Intramural Research (6) 352 (FTEs) $179,580 17 (FTEs) -$1,800
Research Management and Support (7) 307 (FTEs) 65,994 22 (FTEs) -691
Construction (8) 0 0
Buildings and Facilities (9) 0 0
Subtotal, program 659 $1,811,786 39 $15,589
Total changes $18,080

 

History of Budget Authority and FTEs:



 
 

 


Distribution by Mechanism:

 


Change by Selected Mechanism:

 


Budget Authority by Activity (Dollars in Thousands)

Detail: Extramural Research
FY 2012 Actual 1FTEs
FY 2012 Actual 1 Amount
FY 2013 CR FTEs
FY 2013 CR Amount
FY 2014 PB FTEs
FY 2014
PB Amount
Change vs. FY 2012 FTEs
Change vs. FY 2012 Amount
Diabetes, Endocrinology, and Metabolic Diseases $629,321 $634,284 $636,670 $7,349
Digestive Diseases and Nutrition 489,914 493,778 495,636 $5,722
Kidney, Urologic, and Hematologic Diseases 428,897 432,279 433,906 $5,009
Type 1 Diabetes 150,000 150,000 150,000
Subtotal, Extramural $1,698,132 $1,710,341 $1,716,212 $18,080
Intramural Research 335 $179,580 335 $179,580 352 $179,580 17 $0
Research Management and Support 285 $65,994 324 $65,994 307 $65,994 22 $0
TOTAL 620 $1,943,706 659 $1,955,915 659 $1,961,786 39 $18,080

1 Includes FTEs whose payroll obligations are supported by the NIH Common Fund.
2 Includes Transfers and Comparable Adjustments as detailed in the “Amounts Available for Obligation” table.


Authorizing Legislation chart  


Appropriations History 

Fiscal Year Budget Estimate to Congress House Allowance Senate Allowance Appropriation
2005 $1,877,696,000 $1,876,196,000 $1,889,100,000 $1,863,584,000
Rescission -$14,112,000
2006 $1,872,146,000 $1,872,146,000 $1,917,919,000 $1,854,925,000
Rescission -$17,221,000
2007 $1,844,298,000 $1,844,298,000 $1,857,753,000 $1,855,868,000
Rescission $0
2008 $1,858,045,000 $1,881,893,000 $1,897,784,000 $1,855,868,000
Rescission $0
2009 $1,858,487,000 $1,767,071,000 $1,755,881,000 $1,911,338,000
Rescission $0
Supplemental $9,077,000
2010 $1,931,494,000 $1,974,251,000 $1,940,518,000 $1,958,100,000
Rescission $0
2011 $2,007,589,000 $2,004,674,000 $1,958,100,000
Rescission -$15,876,196
2012 $1,987,957,000 $1,987,957,000 $1,922,045,000 $1,950,447,000
Rescission -$3,402,845
2013 $1,942,107,000 $1,947,539,000 $0
Rescission $0
2014 $1,961,786,000 $0


Justification of Budget Request

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

Authorizing Legislation: Section 301 and title IV of the Public Health Service Act, as amended.

Budget Authority (BA)
FY 2012
Actual
FY 2013
CR
FY 2014
President's
Budget
FY 2014 +/-
FY 2012
​BA $1,943,706,000 $1,955,915,000 $1,961,786,000 +$18,080,000
Type 1 Diabetes -$150,000,000 -$150,000,000 -$150,000,000
Labor/HHS: $1,793,706,000 $1,805,915,000 $1,811,786,000 +$18,080,000
FTEs 620 659 659 39

Program funds are allocated as follows: Competitive Grants/Cooperative Agreements; Contracts; Direct Federal/Intramural and Other.


Director’s Overview

The mission of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) is to support and conduct research to combat diabetes and other endocrine and metabolic diseases, liver and other digestive diseases, nutritional disorders, obesity, and kidney, urologic, and hematologic diseases. These diseases are chronic, common, costly, and consequential for patients, their families, and our Nation. Diabetes afflicts an estimated 25.8 million people in the U.S., greatly increasing the risk for many serious complications, such as heart disease and kidney failure. [1] Estimates of chronic kidney disease (CKD) show that more than 23 million Americans are affected, and over 590,000 have irreversible kidney failure. [2] Many urologic diseases are also highly prevalent. [3] Digestive diseases account for an estimated 104.7 million visits to ambulatory care centers and 13.5 million hospitalizations per year. [4] Obesity affects approximately one-third of U.S. adults and about 17 percent of children and adolescents. [5] Obesity is a strong risk factor for type 2 diabetes, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), and many other diseases. Cystic fibrosis and other genetic diseases within NIDDK’s purview are less widespread, but still devastating in their impacts. Building on emerging opportunities from past research investments, NIDDK will continue to pursue basic, clinical, and translational research; research training and career development; and health information dissemination, with continued focus on preserving balance in its investigator-initiated research portfolio.

  1. Theme 1: Today’s Basic Science for Tomorrow’s Breakthroughs
    In 2014, NIDDK will establish several multidisciplinary projects focused on studying the interaction of diet, host, and gut microbiome (collection of microorganisms including bacteria) with an initiative entitled “Diet-Host-Microbiome Interactions in Autoimmune and Metabolic Diseases.” The research will involve both humans and animal models, and will broadly address: 1) autoimmune diseases such as type 1 diabetes, celiac disease, inflammatory bowel diseases, autoimmune liver diseases, and some forms of chronic kidney disease; and 2) metabolic conditions including obesity, type 2 diabetes and NASH. In 2014, with an initiative entitled “A Collaborative Research Network on Disease Modeling and Tissue Repair and Regeneration,” NIDDK will establish a network that focuses on determining the biological and physical requirements for development of functional organ systems that could be used to model diseases or serve as the basis for tissue repair and regeneration therapies. Recently, NIDDK supported basic science research has uncovered new knowledge and developed a disease model system; tools necessary to advance our efforts to treat and prevent disease. A newly identified muscle hormone called irisin, boosts the body’s energy expenditure in a mouse model, and suggests a potential new therapeutic approach for addressing obesity and type 2 diabetes. [6] Scientists have recently identified a protein called TRPV4 that regulates both energy expenditure and inflammation in mice, making the protein a promising target for treating obesity and type 2 diabetes. [7] A recently developed ferret model of cystic fibrosis (CF)-related diabetes also manifests the multi-organ system involvement characteristics of human CF disease and provides another valuable resource for dissecting early CF disease pathogenesis, determining how systemic disease in CF patients influences the progression of early lung disease, and developing novel prevention and therapeutic strategies. [8] New research is uncovering the genetic risk of developing type 2 diabetes in people of European decent, [9] and minority populations [10] , [11] . Recent research shows that pancreatic beta cells can revert to an earlier developmental stage and lose their ability to produce insulin [12] , which may contribute to type 2 diabetes. Therefore, a treatment could be fruitful that allows these metabolically stressed beta cells to “rest” to prevent or delay loss of beta cell identity.

  2. Theme 2: Translational Science
    With an initiative entitled “Personalized Healthcare for Diabetes and Other NIDDK Diseases in the Era of Genomic Medicine,” NIDDK will pursue, in 2014, research targeting pharmacogenomics of anti-diabetic medications, and, particularly, a pharmacogenomic study of metformin to help reveal the physiological processes underlying its anti-diabetic and putative anti-neoplastic effects. Also in 2014, an initiative entitled “Advancing Translational Research in the Reversal of Organ Fibrosis,” will establish a consortium to perform translational research that targets organ fibrosis after acute or chronic injury in the kidney, intestine, liver, pancreas, or bladder. NIDDK will continue to support planning grants for translating research on chronic kidney disease into improved clinical outcomes; support translational research to improve obesity and diabetes outcomes; and to translate the landmark findings of the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) to community settings using the Young Men's Christian Association (YMCA) model, in which the DPP’s “lifestyle” intervention is delivered in a group setting.​

  3. Theme 3: Recruiting and Retaining Diverse Scientific Talent and Creativity
    In 2012, NIDDK held its 10th annual Network of Minority Research Investigators workshop to encourage and facilitate participation of underrepresented racial and ethnic minority groups in the conduct of biomedical research. Several NIDDK-sponsored programs provide opportunities for minority students to obtain research experience. For example, through the NIDDK/Office of Minority Health Research Coordination Summer Internship Program for Underrepresented Groups, undergraduate African Americans, Hispanic Americans, American Indians, Alaska Natives, Native Hawaiian, and other Pacific Islanders can participate in a 10-week summer program conducting research at an NIDDK intramural research laboratory. In addition, NIDDK’s Short-Term Education Program for Underrepresented Persons or STEP-UP provides research education grants to seven institutions to coordinate three high school and four undergraduate STEP-UP programs that provide students with summer research experience and training.

Overall Budget Policy: The FY 2014 President’s Budget request for NIDDK is $1,961.786 million, an increase of $18.080 million or 0.9 percent above the FY 2012 Actual level. NIDDK has targeted a portion of funds for competing research project grants to support high-priority projects outside the payline, including awards to new and early-stage investigators. NIDDK also seeks to balance support for solicitations to the extramural community and funding for investigator-initiated projects. In FY 2014, NIDDK will support new investigators on R01 equivalent awards at success rates equal to those of established investigators submitting new R01 equivalent applications. Support for NRSA training mechanism will be increased by $2.018 million to cover the cost of increased stipends. The Ruth L. Kirschstein NRSA budget reflects a stipend increase to $42,000 for the entry level postdoctoral trainees and fellows along with 4% increases for each subsequent level of experience. These increases are consistent with stipend increases recommended by the Advisory Committee to the NIH Director and the National Research Council. In addition, this increase is consistent with 42 USC 288(b)(5), which anticipates periodic adjustments in stipends "to reflect increases in the cost of living.” The apparent increase in estimated FY 2014 FTE compared to the FY 2012 actual FTE usage level is due to the effect of transferring positions previously funded from a centralized support operation (Division of Extramural Activities Support) to individual ICs as of year-end 2012. As a result of the DEAS transfer, estimated salaries and benefits for FY 2014 are proportionately higher than those identified for FY 2012 and previous years. Funds are included in R&D contracts to support trans-NIH initiatives, such as the Basic Behavioral and Social Sciences Opportunity Network (OppNet). Intramural Research and Research Management and Support will stay the same as the FY 2012 Actual level. NIDDK will continue to support research consistent with the NIH Director’s themes.

 

Program Descriptions and Accomplishments

Diabetes, Endocrinology, and Metabolic Diseases: 

The objectives of this program are to increase understanding of diabetes and other endocrine and metabolic disorders and to develop and test prevention and treatment strategies. The program supports basic, clinical, and translational research, as well as research training, in areas that include type 1 and type 2 diabetes, cystic fibrosis, obesity, energy balance, and endocrinology. Knowledge from this research is communicated to patients, health professionals, and the public through the National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse and the National Diabetes Education Program.

Recent NIDDK-supported research has made important contributions to the treatment and prevention of diseases such as diabetes, as well as those associated with endocrine system and metabolism. The Diabetes Prevention Program Outcomes Study reported that not only does the lifestyle intervention continue to be effective in lowering rates of type 2 diabetes for 10 years, it reduces health care costs to the point that its net cost at 10 years is very low. [13] In addition, although metformin is less effective, use of this inexpensive drug was modestly cost-saving. A recent study showed that bariatric surgery can help control type 2 diabetes more effectively than medical therapy alone, and can help reduce the need for medications to lower blood glucose and lipids, and blood pressure. [14] The Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications follow-up study of the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial reported that controlling blood glucose early in the course of type 1 diabetes yields considerable health dividends, preserving kidney function for decades. [15] The Beta Cell Biology Consortium identified a signaling pathway that regulates pancreatic ß cell regeneration—identifying ways to replace the ß cells and restore insulin-producing capacity could benefit people with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. [16] Key new findings on metabolic pathways important for understanding obesity and type 2 diabetes include: an important role for the enzyme carnitine acetyltransferase in the regulation of fuel switching—the transition between glucose and fat utilization. [17] Produced during glucose metabolism, methylglyoxyl may be responsible for painful nerve pain in diabetes. [18] After decades of investigation, a cellular transport complex has been identified that carries the metabolite pyruvate into the mitochondria, the cell’s energy factory. [19]

Budget Policy: The FY 2014 President's Budget estimate for this program is $636.670 million, an increase of $7.349 million or 1.0 percent above the FY 2012 Actual level. With FY 2014 resources, NIDDK will continue major diabetes clinical trials and encourage and support development of major new investigator-initiated clinical studies. FY 2014 funds will also support research capitalizing on new opportunities to identify diabetes risk genes in minority populations, to advance progress toward developing new therapeutic approaches, and to support comparative effectiveness research. NIDDK will also continue to fund translational research in FY 2014 and support health information dissemination activities to bring scientific discoveries in diabetes and obesity to real-world medical practice and other community settings. In FY 2014, NIDDK will continue an initiative encouraging collaborative, multidisciplinary research teams to work on complex biomedical problems in diabetes, endocrinology, and metabolic diseases. NIDDK will also continue funding for research centers to advance research relevant to diabetes and to cystic fibrosis and other genetic metabolic diseases. NIDDK plans for FY 2014 include capitalizing on new findings relevant to brown fat and gestational diabetes and pursuing other efforts as part of an overall balanced research program.

Program Portrait: Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT)/Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications (EDIC)

FY 2012 Level: $ 9.8 million
FY 2014 Level: $ 8.0 million
Change: -$1.8 million

This year marks the 30th anniversary of landmark research conducted by the DCCT/EDIC research group. The DCCT, which began in 1983, was a multicenter clinical trial in 1,441 people with type 1 diabetes. Because it can take years or decades for diabetes complications to develop, it was not until 1993 that sufficient time had passed for the trial to prove that intensive blood glucose control reduced early signs of eye, nerve, and kidney complications. This finding led to a paradigm shift in the way type 1 diabetes is managed. DCCT participants were invited to join the EDIC follow-up study, and, 30 years later, about 95 percent of living DCCT participants continue to be followed to determine the long-term effects of the therapies beyond the initial treatment period. For example, EDIC researchers have shown that intensive control lowered the risk of heart disease and stroke by about 50 percent. [20]  Recently, after an average 22-year follow-up, EDIC demonstrated that controlling blood glucose prevents loss of kidney function and reduces kidney failure. Compared to conventional therapy, near-normal control of blood glucose—beginning soon after diagnosis of type 1 diabetes and continuing an average 6.5 years—reduced the long-term risk of developing kidney disease by 50 percent. [21]  These data show that carefully managing blood glucose early in the course of type 1 diabetes yields huge dividends, preserving kidney function for decades. It also shows that the full benefit of treatment may take many years to emerge, especially for complications of diabetes, which can progress slowly but have devastating consequences. DCCT/EDIC illustrates the value of long-term research, has revolutionized management of type 1 diabetes, and has led to greatly improved health outcomes for patients.

Digestive Diseases and Nutrition:

The objectives of this program are to increase understanding of digestive diseases, nutrition, and obesity, and to develop and test strategies for disease prevention and treatment. This program supports basic, clinical, and translational research, as well as research training, encompassing fundamental studies of the digestive system; disease-targeted research involving the esophagus, stomach, small intestine, large intestine and anorectum, liver and biliary system, and pancreas; studies relevant to nutrition; and research on obesity. Insights gleaned from scientific efforts are communicated to patients, health professionals, and the public through NIDDK’s National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse and Weight-control Information Network. NIDDK also supports the Hepatitis B Research Network, which is testing treatments in at-risk populations, such as Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders.

In 2014, the Institute will continue to support a number of programs aimed at improving treatment and prevention of diseases associated with the digestive system as well as cardiovascular disease in people with diabetes. CHILDREN, a network conducting studies on severe forms of childhood liver injury, will include new attention to liver disease associated with cystic fibrosis. NIDDK supports A2ALL, a study of risk and benefits associated with adult-to-adult living donor transplantation. NIDDK will continue CORI, a clinical outcomes research initiative and the largest national database on gastrointestinal endoscopy. The Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis Clinical Research Network will continue to complete both clinical trials in adults and children and collection of biospecimens and data. NIDDK supports the Gastrointestinal Stem Cell Consortium to improve understanding of intestinal biology and function, and aid therapeutic development through research on gastrointestinal progenitor cells. A free source of evidence-based information for health care professionals and for researchers studying liver injury associated with prescription and over-the-counter drugs, herbals, and dietary supplements is now available from the NIH (www.livertox.nih.gov). Support of Look AHEAD, a major long-term study designed to determine whether intensive lifestyle measures involving diet and exercise improve morbidity and mortality from cardiovascular diseases in people with diabetes, will continue. The intervention arm of the trial was terminated early after finding no cardiovascular benefits from weight loss in overweight and obese adults with type 2 diabetes. Recent research identified 71 new human genes associated with Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, two chronic inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) that affect the small and large intestines. [22]

Budget Policy: The FY 2014 President's Budget estimate for this program is $495.636 million, an increase of $5.722 million or 1.0 percent above the FY 2012 Actual level. In FY 2014, NIDDK will continue major clinical research networks to help understand and treat liver diseases, including hepatitis B and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. Among its obesity-related efforts in FY 2014, NIDDK will support major ongoing observational studies to assess the health risks and benefits of weight-loss surgery in extremely obese adults and adolescents, as well as an ongoing trial evaluating the long-term health effects of weight loss in obese adults with type 2 diabetes (Look AHEAD). NIDDK will also use FY 2014 funds to support Digestive Diseases Research Core Centers, and to sustain a consortium that is conducting cutting-edge genetic research on inflammatory bowel diseases. Research on intestinal stem cells that can benefit a variety of digestive diseases will continue in FY 2014, along with other efforts as part of an overall balanced research program.

Program Portrait: Intestinal Stem Cell Consortium (ISCC)

FY 2012 Level: $3.5 million
FY 2014 Level: $3.4 million
Change: -$0.1 million


The inner lining of the intestine plays an essential role in absorption of nutrients and balancing absorption and secretion of water and electrolytes, as well as providing a barrier against entry of bacteria. The lining is only one cell layer thick, and cells slough off continuously, requiring a process of continuous regeneration to replace them. Cells are also replaced following any injury. In 2009, NIDDK established the Intestinal Stem Cell Consortium (ISCC) of individual research projects and a Coordinating Center to study stem cells of the small intestine in order to 1) isolate, culture, characterize, functionally validate, and compare stem cell populations from the small intestine epithelium in vivo and in vitro, 2) share data, biomaterials, models, reagents, resources and methods between projects in the ISCC, and 3) make these data publically available through a website to be developed by the Coordinating Center. Recently, ISCC researchers looked closely at two populations of intestinal stem cells that are necessary for regeneration. These cells were identified by their different locations in the intestinal surface, as well as the unique proteins they make—Lgr5 or Bmi1. Using a microscopic technique that highlights intestinal stem cells with fluorescent markers, they found that the stem cells with Lgr5 actively proliferated under normal conditions, but were destroyed by radiation. The stem cells marked by Bmi1 were relatively inactive under normal conditions, but resisted radiation and proliferated dramatically following injury. The Bmi1-marked stem cells in culture could also form some Lgr5-marked stem cells, showing their capacity to repopulate the intestine with both stem cell populations following injury.

Kidney, Urologic, and Hematologic Diseases: 

The objectives of this program are to increase the understanding of diseases and disorders of the kidneys, urinary tract, and blood (hematologic), and to develop and test prevention and treatment strategies. Basic, clinical, and translational research, as well as research training, is supported in the areas of chronic kidney disease (CKD), diabetic kidney disease, end-stage renal disease (ESRD or kidney failure), polycystic kidney disease, and many other kidney diseases; urinary incontinence, benign prostatic hyperplasia, interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome, stones, impotence, congenital urologic disorders, and urinary tract infections; and disorders of the blood and blood-forming organs, including sickle cell disease, Cooley’s anemia, hemochromatosis, and the anemia of inflammation and of chronic disease. Glomerular disease is the third leading cause of ESRD in the U.S., after diabetes and hypertension. In 2014, NIDDK will establish a Glomerular Disease Cohort to conduct translational and clinical research that promotes therapeutic development for glomerular diseases. Expanded in 2014, the Symptoms of Lower Urinary Tract Dysfunction Research Network will support a cooperative research network to improve measurement of symptoms in both men and women to advance clinical studies. Recent research supported by the Institute has shed light on the age at which African Americans with kidney disease begin hemodialysis to treat kidney failure—those with two copies of the APOL1 G1 variant of the gene began hemodialysis at a significantly younger age, when they were about 49 years old, than those with one copy of the variant, who began treatment at about 56 years of age. Science-based information is communicated to patients, health professionals, and the public through NIDDK’s National Kidney and Urologic Diseases Information Clearinghouse and National Kidney Disease Education Program (NKDEP).

Budget Policy: The FY 2014 President's Budget estimate for this program is $433.906 million, an increase of $5.009 million or 1.0 percent above the FY Actual 2012 level. In FY 2014, NIDDK will continue support for ongoing major clinical studies of CKD in adults and children and fund new research to identify and validate biomarkers and risk assessment tools for patients with this condition. NIDDK also plans to continue to sponsor planning grants to conduct translational research on the effectiveness of interventions shown in clinical trials to prevent, treat, and manage CKD, and will continue to sponsor studies to improve adherence to medical therapy in adolescents with CKD. In FY 2014, NIDDK will continue studies to improve measurements of outcomes in lower urinary tract disorders of the prostate and urinary bladder. NIDDK will continue treatment trials for polycystic kidney disease (HALT-PKD study) and continue support for the Consortium for Radiologic Imaging Studies of polycystic kidney disease (PKD); results of these studies will help to define measures of kidney disease progression. Centers focused on kidney, urologic, and hematologic research will receive continued funding, as will research on acute kidney injury and a study of arteriovenous fistulas. NIDDK will also continue support for the Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial (led by NHLBI) and for other efforts as part of an overall balanced research portfolio.

Program Portrait: Glomerular Disease Consortium

FY 2012 Level: $0.0 million
FY 2014 Level: $3.0 million
Change: +$3.0 million


Primary glomerular disease results specifically from minimal change disease (MCD), focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS), immunoglobulin A nephropathy (IGAN), or idiopathic membranous nephropathy (IMN). Recent advances in the mechanistic aspects of these diseases provide hope for new methods of diagnosis and treatment. Among the major challenges to development of clinical therapies for these diseases are that they are relatively rare, compared with the more common condition diabetic nephropathy, and that their slow progression 
that is often measured in decades, rather than months or years. This translates into significant difficulties in recruiting participants in sufficient numbers to study disease mechanisms, identify disease targets and biomarkers, and development of diagnostics for translational and clinical studies. To address these issues, in 2014 the NIDDK will establish a Glomerular Disease Consortium to conduct translational and clinical research that promotes therapeutic development for primary glomerular diseases. The overall objectives of this consortium include: 1) proposal of the scientific question(s) that will form the basis of the longitudinal cohort data collection, 2) development of a common protocol, 3) recruitment of participants for a natural history cohort study, 4) longitudinal collection of phenotypic, genetic, biochemical, and tissue data, 5) analysis of these data including Systems biology approaches to the dataset, and 6) applications for subsequent ancillary studies to identify disease targets, develop biomarker-therapy combinations, and establish and validate Patient Reported Outcomes (PROs) and other surrogate outcomes for disease progression and remission.

Special Statutory Funding Program for Type 1 Diabetes Research: 

Complementing efforts of the Diabetes, Endocrinology, and Metabolic Disease program, the Special Program’s goal is to foster improved treatment, prevention, and cure of type 1 diabetes, and its complications through basic, clinical, and translational research around six scientific goals: 1) identifying genetic and environmental causes of type 1 diabetes ($25 million); 2) preventing or reversing the disease ($30 million); 3) developing cell replacement therapy ($25 million); 4) improving management and care ($30 million); 5) preventing or reducing diabetes complications ($30 million); and 6) attracting new talent and applying new technologies to research ($10 million) (FY 2014 estimate dollars). Although focused on type 1 diabetes, aspects of this research are relevant to other autoimmune disorders, as well as type 2 diabetes. Both type 1 and type 2 diabetes share impaired function of insulin-producing beta cells of the pancreas along with potential complications, such as heart disease, stroke, blindness, kidney failure, nerve damage, and lower limb amputations. In 2012, NIDDK funded new research to improve adherence to therapy in pre-teens, adolescents, and young adults with type 1 diabetes, and also funded planning grants for new trials in clinical management of the disease. Building on recent progress in identifying genes associated with type 1 diabetes, NIDDK funded new research to understand the function of those genes. NIDDK also leveraged past investments in clinical research by supporting ancillary studies using archived clinical samples. NIDDK supported small business research to advance progress toward an artificial pancreas, as well as to develop new strategies to identify individuals at risk of developing the disease. To bring new investigators to type 1 diabetes research, NIDDK funded new training programs to support and develop behavioral scientists and bioengineers in careers in diabetes research.

Budget Policy: The FY 2014 President's Budget estimate for the Special Statutory Funding Program for Type 1 Diabetes Research is $150 million, the same as FY 2012 Actual level. NIDDK administers the program, but because of its trans-HHS nature, the resources are disbursed among multiple NIH Institutes and Centers. Among ongoing efforts that will continue with FY 2014 funds are studies to identify environmental causes of type 1 diabetes in genetically susceptible individuals as a basis for the development of a vaccine or other preventative intervention and trials to test approaches to prevent or slow the onset of the disease ($42 million); research on islet transplantation ($6 million); and trials to test approaches to prevent or treat diabetic eye disease ($2 million). FY 2014 funds will also support new and ongoing fundamental research to uncover the etiology and pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes and its complications ($39.3 million), and research on human beta cells toward the goal of developing cell replacement therapies ($52 million). Research on development of artificial pancreas technologies will continue in FY 2014 through initiatives funding small business research to develop new therapeutics and monitoring technologies for type 1 diabetes ($4.2 million). FY 2014 funds will also foster research and early career development for pediatric endocrinologists, behavioral scientists, and bioengineers studying new approaches to treat, prevent, and cure type 1 diabetes ($4.5 million).

Intramural Research:

The objective of the Institute’s Intramural Research Program (IRP) is to conduct basic, translational, and clinical biomedical research related to diabetes and other endocrine and metabolic diseases; digestive diseases, including liver diseases and nutritional disorders; obesity; kidney diseases; and hematologic diseases. Intramural research is conducted in the Institute’s laboratories and clinical facilities in Bethesda, Maryland, as well as in Phoenix, Arizona, where a long-standing research relationship with the Pima Indians in the region, who have the highest rate of diabetes in the world, has led to important scientific advances in type 2 diabetes and obesity. Research training is also an integral component of the IRP. The NIDDK IRP is using genome-wide association studies on large cohorts of Native Americans to identify genes linked to higher body mass index and increased risk for diabetes. [23] NIDDK IRP research uncovered a potential treatment for chronic pain by A3 adenosine receptor activation; molecules that activate the A3 subtype of the cellular receptor for the molecule adenosine have a potent anti-pain effect. [24] Other IRP research determined how pathogenic bacteria acquire iron from humans [25] , uncovered a process central to the degradation of modified cell membrane proteins [26] , and developed novel techniques to precisely map genetic recombination (process by which DNA regions are broken and rejoined during cell division) hot spots in mammals [27] , and engineer nanoscale scaffolds for therapeutic drug delivery [28] .

Budget Policy: The FY 2014 President's Budget estimate for this program is $179.580 million, the same as FY 2012 Actual level. With FY 2014 funds, the NIDDK IRP will continue a broad spectrum of research studies to strengthen understanding of basic biology and disease mechanism, and evaluate potential therapeutics approaches. For example, in FY 2014, intramural scientists will continue research on obesity in the trans-NIH Metabolic Clinical Research Unit, as well as research relevant to diabetes; digestive diseases, including liver disease; kidney disease; and hematologic disease. The program will also continue to support research training.

Research Management and Support (RMS):

RMS activities provide administrative, budgetary, logistical, and scientific support in the review, award, and monitoring of research grants, training awards, and research and development contracts. RMS functions also encompass strategic planning, coordination, and evaluation of the Institute’s programs, regulatory compliance, international coordination, and liaison with other federal agencies, Congress, and the public. Through RMS activities, NIDDK continues to administratively support meritorious basic, clinical, and translational research and research training efforts, and also continues its health information dissemination and education/outreach activities. Additionally, NIDDK continues its strategic planning, evaluation, among other necessary related activities.

Budget Policy: The FY 2014 President's Budget estimate for RMS is $65.994 million, the same as FY 2012 Actual level. NIDDK will continue effective research management and support so as to deploy research resources to the most meritorious and promising areas, and to communicate research opportunities and findings to investigators, health professionals, and the public.

Budget Authority by Object Class(Dollars in thousands)

Total compensable workyears​​ FY 2012 Actual FY 2014 PB Increase or Decrease
Full-time employment 620 659 39
Full-time equivalent of overtime and holiday hours 1 1 0
Average ES salary (in dollars) $164,830 $166,894 $2,064
Average GM/GS grade 12 12 0
Average GM/GS salary (in dollars) $97,376 $98,596 $1,220
Average salary, grade established by act of July 1, 1944 (42 U.S.C. 207) (in dollars) $97,581 $100,401 $2,820
Average salary of ungraded positions (in dollars) 92,176 93,331 1,155


Budget Authority by Object Class (Dollars in thousands)

​Object Classes FY 2012 Actual FY 2014 PB Increase or Decrease
Personnel Compensation - Full-time permanent (11.1) $35,950 $39,087 $3,137
Personnel Compensation - Other than full-time permanent (11.3) 31,896 34,320 2,424
Personnel Compensation - Other personnel compensation (11.5) 1,140 1,238 98
Personnel Compensation - Military personnel (11.7) 1,859 2,007 148
Personnel Compensation - Special personnel services payments (11.8) 12,947 13,842 895
Total, Personnel Compensation $83,792 $90,494 $6,702
Personnel benefits (12.0) $21,071 $22,771 $1,700
Military personnel benefits (12.2) 1,491 1,611 120
Benefits for former personnel (13.0) 0 0 0
Subtotal, Pay Costs $106,355 $114,876 $8,521
Travel and transportation of persons (21.0) $1,946 $1,946 $0
Transportation of things (22.0) 205 205 0
Rental payments to GSA (23.1) 1 1 0
Rental payments to others (23.2) 0 0 0
Communications, utilities and miscellaneous charges (23.3) 1,279 1,278 -1
Printing and reproduction (24.0) 152 152 0
Consulting services (25.1) 2,966 2,167 -799
Other services (25.2) 13,866 10,075 -3,791
Purchase of goods and services from government accounts (25.3) 167,008 176,435 9,427
Operation and maintenance of facilities (25.4) 344 344 0
Research and development contracts (25.5) 31,320 25,488 -5,832
Medical care (25.6) 1,301 1,302 1
Operation and maintenance of equipment (25.7) 5,725 4,725 -1,000
Subsistence and support of persons (25.8) 0 0 0
Subtotal, Other Contractual Services (25.0) $222,531 $220,536 -$1,995
Supplies and materials (26.0) $14,760 $12,896 -$1,864
Equipment (31.0) 7,985 6,853 -1,132
Land and structures (32.0) 0 0 0
Investments and loans (33.0) 0 0 0
Grants, subsidies and contributions (41.0) 1,438,492 1,453,043 14,551
Insurance claims and indemnities (42.0) 0 0 0
Interest and dividends (43.0) 0 0 0
Refunds (44.0) 0 0 0
Subtotal, Non-Pay Costs $1,687,352 $1,696,910 $9,558
Total Budget Authority by Object Class $1,793,706 $1,811,786 $18,080

* Includes FTEs whose payroll obligations are supported by the NIH Common Fund.


Salaries and Expenses (Dollars in thousands)

​OBJECT CLASSES FY 2012 Actual FY 2014 PB Increase or Decrease
Personnel Compensation - Full-time permanent (11.1) $35,950 $39,087 $3,137
Personnel Compensation - Other than full-time permanent (11.3) 31,896 34,320 2,424
Personnel Compensation - Other personnel compensation (11.5) 1,140 1,238 98
Personnel Compensation - Military personnel (11.7) 1,859 2,007 148
Personnel Compensation - Special personnel services payments (11.8) 12,947 13,842 895
Total Personnel Compensation (11.9) $83,792 $90,494 $6,702
Civilian personnel benefits (12.1) $21,071 $22,771 $1,700
Military personnel benefits (12.2) 1,491 1,611 120
Benefits to former personnel (13.0) 0 0 0
Subtotal, Pay Costs $106,354 $114,876 $8,522
Travel (21.0) $1,946 $1,946 $0
Transportation of things (22.0) 205 205 0
Rental payments to others (23.2) 0 0 0
Communications, utilities and miscellaneous charges (23.3) 1,279 1,278 -1
Printing and reproduction (24.0) 152 152 0
Other Contractual Services: Advisory and assistance services (25.1) 2,966 2,167 -799
Other Contractual Services: Other services (25.2) 13,866 10,075 -3,791
Other Contractual Services: Purchases from government accounts (25.3) 105,199 104,733 -466
Other Contractual Services: Operation and maintenance of facilities (25.4) 344 344 0
Other Contractual Services: Operation and maintenance of equipment (25.7) 5,725 4,725 -1,000
Other Contractual Services: Subsistence and support of persons (25.8) 0 0 0
Subtotal Other Contractual Services $128,100 $122,044 -$6,056
Supplies and materials (26.0) $14,750 $12,885 -$1,865
Subtotal, Non-Pay Costs $146,432 $138,510 -$7,922
Total, Administrative Costs $252,786 $253,386 $600


Details of Full-Time Equivalent Employment (FTEs)

​OFFICE/DIVISION FY 2012 Actual Civilian FY 2012 Actual Military FY 2012 Actual Total FY 2013 CR Civilian FY 2013 CR Military FY 2013 CR Total FY 2014 PB Civilian FY 2014 PB Military FY 2014 PB Total
Office of the Director Direct: 152 0 152 152 0 152 152 0 152
Office of the Director Reimbursable: 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Office of the Director Total: 152 0 152 152 0 152 152 0 152
Division of Diabetes, Endocrinology, and Metabolic Diseases Direct: 25 2 27 25 2 27 25 2 27
Division of Diabetes, Endocrinology, and Metabolic Diseases Reimbursable: 2 0 2 2 0 2 2 0 2
Division of Diabetes, Endocrinology, and Metabolic Diseases Total: 27 2 29 27 2 29 27 2 29
Division of Digestive Diseases and Nutrition Direct: 19 3 22 19 3 22 19 3 22
Division of Digestive Diseases and Nutrition Reimbursable: 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Division of Digestive Diseases and Nutrition Total: 19 3 22 19 3 22 19 3 22
Division of Kidney, Urologic, and Hematologic Diseases Direct: 20 0 20 20 0 20 20 0 20
Division of Kidney, Urologic, and Hematologic Diseases Reimbursable: 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Division of Kidney, Urologic, and Hematologic Diseases Total: 20 0 20 20 0 20 20 0 20
Division of Nutrition Research Coordination Direct: 8 0 8 8 0 8 8 0 8
Division of Nutrition Research Coordination Reimbursable: 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Division of Nutrition Research Coordination Total: 8 0 8 8 0 8 8 0 8
Division of Extramural Activities Direct: 53 1 54 92 1 93 75 1 76
Division of Extramural Activities Reimbursable: 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Division of Extramural Activities Total: 53 1 54 92 1 93 75 1 76
Division of Intramural Research Programs Direct: 317 11 328 317 11 328 334 11 345
Division of Intramural Research Programs Reimbursable: 7 0 7 7 0 7 7 0 7
Division of Intramural Research Programs Total: 324 11 335 324 11 335 341 11 352
Total 603 17 620 642 17 659 642 17 659

Includes FTEs whose payroll obligations are supported by the NIH Common Fund.

FTEs supported by funds from Cooperative Research and Development Agreements.


Average GM/GS Grade by Year

​FISCAL YEAR Average GS Grade
2010 11.9
2011 12.0
2012 12.0
2013 12.0
2014 12.0
 

 

​Detail of Positions

GRADE FY 2012 Actual FY 2013 CR FY 2014 PB
Total, ES Positions 1 1 1
Total, ES Salary 164,830 165,242 166,894
GM/GS-15 41 41 41
GM/GS-14 76 74 74
GM/GS-13 85 85 85
GS-12 62 74 74
GS-11 40 50 50
GS-10 0 0 0
GS-9 31 36 36
GS-8 25 30 30
GS-7 13 17 17
GS-6 4 6 6
GS-5 2 5 5
GS-4 0 0 0
GS-3 0 0 0
GS-2 0 0 0
GS-1 0 0 0
Subtotal 379 418 418
Grades established by Act of July 1, 1944 (42 U.S.C. 207): Assistant Surgeon General 0 0 0
Grades established by Act of July 1, 1944 (42 U.S.C. 207): Director Grade 10 10 10
Grades established by Act of July 1, 1944 (42 U.S.C. 207): Senior Grade 4 4 4
Grades established by Act of July 1, 1944 (42 U.S.C. 207): Full Grade 2 2 2
Grades established by Act of July 1, 1944 (42 U.S.C. 207): Senior Assistant Grade 1 1 1
Grades established by Act of July 1, 1944 (42 U.S.C. 207): Assistant Grade 0 0 0
Subtotal, Grades established by Act of July 1, 1944 (42 U.S.C. 207) 17 17 17
Ungraded 251 251 251
Total permanent positions 393 393 393
Total positions, end of year 648 687 687
Total full-time equiv (FTE) at year end 620 659 659
Average ES salary 164,830 165,242 166,894
Average GM/GS grade 12 12 12
Average GM/GS salary 97,376 97,619 98,596

Includes FTEs whose payroll obligations are supported by the NIH Common Fund.

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[3]NIDDK, NIH/DHHS. Kidney and urologic diseases statistics (http://kidney.niddk.nih.gov/statistics/), 2010.

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[23]Traurig MT, Orczewska JI, Ortiz DJ,et al. Evidence for a Role of LPGAT1 in Influencing BMI and Percent Body Fat in Native Americans. Obesity Jun 22. doi: 10.1038/oby.2012.161. Traurig MT, Perez JM, Ma L, et al. Variants in the LEPR Gene Are Nominally Associated With Higher BMI and Lower 24-h Energy Expenditure in Pima Indians. Obesity Jun 22. doi: 10.1038/oby.2012.159, 2012

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