U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

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NIDDK News Item

13 March 2014

In recognition of World Kidney Day 2014 on March 13, the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) and the National Institute on Aging (NIA) at the National Institutes of Health remind older Americans about the importance of protecting their kidneys and urge them to better understand the decline of kidney function as people age.

NIDDK News Item

04 February 2014

The National Institutes of Health, 10 biopharmaceutical companies and several nonprofit organizations today launched an unprecedented partnership to transform the current model for identifying and validating the most promising biological targets of disease for new diagnostics and drug development.

NIDDK News Item

22 December 2013

In a 1,300-word article on its front page, the New York Times (12/22, A1, O'Connor, Subscription Publication) reported that an analysis by the Drug-Induced Liver Injury Network, which was established by the National Institutes of Health, indicated that "dietary supplements account for nearly 20 percent of drug-related liver injuries that turn up in hospitals, up from 7 percent a decade ago." The findings "included only the most severe cases of liver damage referred to a representative group of hospitals around the country, and the investigators said they were undercounting the actual number of cases." Some of these patients ultimately need a liver transplant or will die due to liver failure. The article discusses the loosely regulated supplement industry in the US.

NIDDK Newsletter

Features updates on NIH and NIDDK activities, events, NIDDK-specific plans, and trans-NIH issues.

NIDDK News Item

21 November 2013

Even with more prescriptions for growth hormone, children and adolescents with chronic kidney disease were less likely to grow to normal height ranges if they came from lower-income families, according to research funded by the National Institutes of Health. Results from the Chronic Kidney Disease in Children (CKiD) Study are published in the December issue of the American Journal of Kidney Diseases and online today at http://www.ajkd.org.

NIDDK News Item

14 November 2013

Diabetes does not strike a person alone. It strikes families and communities. It strikes our nation and the world. During today’s World Diabetes Day and National Diabetes Month this November, we at the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, part of the National Institutes of Health, renew our efforts to prevent, manage and one day cure diabetes. As well, we encourage families to take steps to improve their health and work together to fight diabetes and its serious and sometimes fatal consequences.

NIDDK News Item

12 November 2013

A gene variant common in African-Americans predicts that people with that gene who also have chronic kidney disease (CKD) are twice as likely to progress to kidney failure as African-Americans without the high-risk gene and white people with CKD. People with the high-risk gene also tend to lose kidney function at twice the rate of those without the gene, according to the research, which was funded by the National Institutes of Health.

NIDDK News Item

04 November 2013

National Institutes of Health-funded researchers found that adults had significant weight loss three years after bariatric surgery, with the majority losing the most weight during the first year. A separate study in teens found few incidences of complications in the first 30 days after bariatric surgery. These studies are part of the Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery (LABS) and Teen-LABS. More than one-third of U.S. adults are obese, defined as having a body mass index or BMI of 30 or higher, and almost 17 percent of youth are also obese. Severe obesity is a BMI of 35 or more in adults and teens. BMI measures weight in relation to height.

NIDDK Newsletter

Features new and updated materials, research updates, and partner highlights.

NIDDK Newsletter

Provides laboratory professionals with the latest in clinical professional news from the National Kidney Disease Education Program’s Laboratory Working Group.

NIDDK Newsletter

Features information on National Diabetes Education Program activities, messages and products.

NIDDK Newsletter

Features NKDEP community activities, tips for talking about kidney health, and materials to use in health education.

NIDDK Newsletter

Features diabetes news and research, and new and updated publications.

NIDDK News Item

21 October 2013

Researchers have begun the first definitive, large-scale clinical trial to investigate if a vitamin D supplement helps prevent or delay type 2 diabetes in adults who have pre-diabetes andwho are at high risk for developing type 2. Funded by the NIH, the study is taking place at about 20 study sites across the United States.

NIDDK Newsletter

Provides updates with registered dietitians and nutritionists on new diet-related materials and activities, and opportunities to assist NKDEP and its efforts.

NIDDK Newsletter

Features urologic diseases research and news, and new and updated publications.

NIDDK Newsletter

Features kidney disease research and news, and new and updated publications.

NIDDK Newsletter

Features celiac disease news and research, updates on the Celiac Disease Awareness Campaign, and new and updated publications.

NIDDK Newsletter

Features digestive diseases news and research, updates on the Bowel Control Awareness Campaign, and new and updated publications.

NIDDK News Item

09 September 2013

People are host to trillions of microbes living on their skin and in the gut, vagina, mouth, nose, lungs, and penis. These microbes live as communities in and on the human body and are known as the human microbiome. For the most part, we peacefully co-exist with these microbes. But sometimes some of these microorganisms such as, bacteria, can trigger responses that may cause people to develop a disease. To better understand how and why alteration of the normal microbiome at various body sites promotes diseases, the National Institutes of Health will fund three innovative research projects for the next 3 years.

NIDDK Grantee News

28 August 2013

[Wright State University] In adults with chronic kidney disease (CKD), cigarette smoking is associated with an increased risk for CKD progression and transplant failure. In children, secondhand smoke (SHS) exposure has been associated with elevated blood pressure. There are no studies on the prevalence and effect of SHS exposure in CKD.

NIDDK News Item

01 August 2013

Deletion of a protein in white blood cells improves their ability to fight the bacteria staphylococcus aureus and possibly other infections in mice with chronic granulomatous disease (CGD), according to a NIH study. CGD, a genetic disorder also found in people, is marked by recurrent, life-threatening infections. The study’s findings appear online in The Journal of Clinical Investigation.

NIDDK News Item

29 July 2013

Researchers at the NIH have created and confirmed the accuracy of a mathematical model that predicts how weight and body fat in children respond to adjustments in diet and physical activity. The results will appear online July 30 in Lancet Diabetes and Endocrinology.

NIDDK News Item

29 July 2013

Researchers from the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) study are embarking on another five years of work to identify risk factors for progression of early stage chronic kidney disease (CKD), better understand the importance of reduced kidney function in older persons, and learn what role CKD may play in other illnesses that require hospitalization. CRIC is supported by the National Institutes of Health.

NIDDK Grantee News

23 July 2013

[Harvard Medical School] Classic brown fat and inducible beige fat both dissipate chemical energy in the form of heat through the actions of mitochondrial uncoupling protein 1. This nonshivering thermogenesis is crucial for mammals as a defense against cold and obesity/diabetes.

NIDDK Grantee News

08 July 2013

[McGill University] To better understand the difficulty of looking for a cure, or even effective treatment, one must understand the large and complex nature of the CFTR protein. It is made up of 1,480 amino acids strung together in five three-dimensional strands (called domains) that spin together and fold to act as building blocks for the CFTR protein.