U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Clinical Research Strategies for Fructose Metabolism

11/13/2012 7:00 AM
11/14/2012 7:00 AM
Yes
No
For questions concerning program content, please contact:
Maren R. Laughlin, Ph.D.
Senior Advisor for Integrative Metabolism
Division of Diabetes, Endocrinology, and Metabolic Diseases
NIDDK, NIH
Two Democracy Plaza
6707 Democracy Boulevard
Bethesda, MD 20892
Phone: (301) 594-8802
Email: maren.laughlin@nih.gov
 
For questions concerning meeting logistics, please contact:
John Hare, CMP
The Scientific Consulting Group, Inc.
656 Quince Orchard Road, Suite 210
Gaithersburg, MD 20878
Phone: (301) 670-4990
Fax: (301) 670-3815
Email: jhare@scgcorp.com
Bethesda
 

Event Details

Meeting Objective:

This workshop is sponsored by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), the National Institutes of Health (NIH), and the Agriculture Research Service (ARS) of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA).

Goals:

Consumption of simple sugars (sucrose, glucose, and fructose) currently is estimated at 20 percent of the U.S. diet on average. This coincides with what has been described as an epidemic of obesity and its complications, such as fatty liver, heart disease, and diabetes. Although excess calories are clearly at fault, there is a great deal of public and academic interest in the particular roles, if any, played by simple sugars in the common health problems of Americans. There are some outstanding studies in the literature on the metabolism of fructose and its effects on health outcomes, and many more are being conducted. The current interest, combined with the difficulties of studying a nutrient consumed as a large part of a typical modern diet, led the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to propose a small, 2-day workshop at the NIH Campus in Bethesda, MD, focused on clinical design for studies of fructose and sugar ingestion. Participants from academia, government, advocacy groups, and industry will be invited.

This workshop will showcase studies of the effects of fructose on human whole-body metabolism, energy balance, and obesity as well as on the liver, kidney, and adipose tissue.
 
Participants will discuss the following:
  • What questions concerning human health remain to be answered?
  • How might clinical trials be designed to provide interpretable data?
  • What are appropriate outcomes measures?

Planning Committee:

Peter J. Havel, D.V.M., Ph.D.
Professor, Department of Molecular Biosciences
Department of Nutrition
School of Veterinary Medicine
University of California, Davis

John Bantle, M.D.
Professor of Medicine
Director, Division of Endocrinology and Diabetes
Department of Medicine
University of Minnesota  

Elizabeth Parks, Ph.D.
Associate Professor
Center for Human Nutrition
University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas 

Edward Doo, M.D.
Director, Liver Diseases Research Program
Division of Digestive Diseases and Nutrition
NIDDK, NIH 

Michael F. Flessner, M.D., Ph.D.
Director of Inflammatory Renal Diseases
Division of Kidney, Urological, and Hematological Diseases
NIDDK, NIH 

Van S. Hubbard, M.D., Ph.D.
Director, NIH Division of Nutrition Research Coordination
Rear Admiral, U.S. Public Health Service (Ret.) 

David M. Klurfeld, Ph.D.
National Program Leader, Human Nutrition
Human Nutrition Research Center
USDA-Agricultural Research Service 

Maren R. Laughlin, Ph.D.
Senior Advisor for Integrative Metabolism
Division of Diabetes, Endocrinology, and Metabolic Diseases
NIDDK, NIH 

Catherine Loria
Epidemiology Branch
Program in Prevention and Population Sciences
Division of Cardiovascular Sciences
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, NIH 

Padma Maruvada, Ph.D., M.Sc.
Program Director
Division of Digestive Diseases and Nutrition
NIDDK, NIH​

Agenda

Tuesday, November 13, 2012

S​ession I: Dietary Fructose and Its Metabolism

Chair: John Bantle, University of Minnesota

8:30​ a.m. Welcome and Introductions
Griffin Rodgers, Director, NIDDK

Statement of Goals
Workshop Chair
8:40 a.m. Epidemiology of Fructose Consumption
Bernadette Marriott, Medical University of South Carolina
9:05 a.m. Effects of Fructose Intake on Body Weight-metanalyses
John Sievenpiper, University of Toronto
9:30 a.m. Historical Overview of Fructose Metabolism
Rick Johnson, University of Colorado Denver
9:55 a.m. Discussion - Statement of Workshop Goals

What questions remain to be answered that require clinical research?
10:15 a.m. Break​

Session II: Fructose and Energy Balance

Chair: Karen Teff, The University of Pennsylvania

10:45 a.m. Fructose, Obesity, and Weight Gain
Luc Tappy, Universit de Lausanne
11:10 a.m. Metabolic Rate and Fat Oxidation
Nancy Keim, University of California, Davis
11:35 a.m. Fructose in the Brain
John Purnell, Oregon Health & Science University
12:00 p.m. Pediatric Studies and Ingestive Behavior
Sonia Caprio, Yale University
12:25 p.m. Distribution of Box Lunches
12:40 p.m. Working Lunch and Discussion

What are the open questions concerning the role of fructose/sugar in energy balance, obesity, and ingestive behavior that can be answered with current technology?
1:10 p.m. Break

Session III: Fructose Metabolic Effects in People and Non-human Primates

Chair: Peter Havel, University of California, Davis

1:30 p.m. Short-term Feeding and Lipoprotein Production and Clearance
Elizabeth Parks, The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center
2:00 p.m. Long-term Effects of Consuming Sugar-sweetened Beverages on Lipids and Insulin Sensitivity
Kimber Stanhope, University of California, Davis
2:30 p.m. Adipose Tissue Inflammation and Insulin Resistance
Mario Kratz, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center
3:00 p.m. Break
3:30 p.m. Metabolic Pathways by Which Fructose Consumption Affects Lipid Metabolism and Insulin Sensitivity
Jean-Marc Schwartz, Touro University
4:00 p.m. Very Long-term Effects of Fructose on Non-human Primates
Andrew Bremer, Vanderbilt University
4:30 p.m. Discussion

What are the open questions concerning the role of fructose in metabolism (insulin resistance, lipid metabolism, other cardiovascular disease factors) that can be answered with current technology?
5:00 p.m. Adjournment
7:00 p.m. Organized Dinner (at personal expense)

Wednesday, November 14, 2012

Session IV: Fructose Effects on the Liver and Kidney

Chair: Elizabeth Parks, The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center

8:00 a.m. Fatty Liver and Liver Disease
Michael Goran, University of Southern California
8:25 a.m. Fatty Liver in Childhood and Adolescents
Miriam Vos, Emory University
8:50 a.m. Liver (ATP) in Response to Fructose Challenge as a Biomarker of Liver Function
Manal Abdelmalek
9:15 a.m. Kidney Disease and Uric Acid and Hypertension
Miguel A Lanaspa, University of Colorado
9:40 a.m. Break
10:10 a.m. Discussion

What are the open questions concerning the role of fructose in organ dysfunction that can be answered with current technology? Does obesity play a role? What about diabetes or cardiovascular disease?
11:00 a.m. Distribution of Box Lunches

Session V: Design and Outcomes Measures for Studies of the Health Effects of Fructose Ingestion

Chair: Meredith Hawkins, Yeshiva University

11:15 a.m.

Panel Discussion
Karen Teff, The University of Pennsylvania
Miriam Vos, Emory University
Sonia Caprio, Yale University
Jean-Marc Schwartz, Touro University
Kimber Stanhope, University of California, Davis
John Bantle, University of Minnesota
Elizabeth Parks, The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center
Lisa Cooper Hudgins, The Rogosin Institute/Weill Cornell Medical College
Brian Soher, Duke University
David D'Allessio, University of Cincinnati
George Bray, Pennington Biomedical Research Center
Sam Klein, Washington University in St. Louis


Three study designs will each be designed, presented, and critiqued by a four-member team.

2:00 p.m. Wrap-up
Workshop Chair
2:15 p.m. Adjournment
​​​​​

Directions/Travel

Air Travel:

Travel arrangements are your own responsibility, but you should know that three airports (listed below) serve the Washington, DC, metropolitan area. Please make your own air or rail reservations.
 
Should you decide to extend your stay to take advantage of lower fares, DC-area attractions are only a short distance away from the host hotel.
 
Hotel and travel information is listed below. 

Accommodations:

The following hotels provide lodging in a relatively close proximity that is accessible by taxi.

Bethesda Marriott Hotel
5151 Pooks Hill Road 
Bethesda, MD 20814 ​
P: 301-897-9400 or 1-800-228-9290 
F: 301-897-0192 

Bethesda North Marriott Hotel & Conference Center
5701 Marinelli Road
North Bethesda, MD 20852 
P: 301-822-9200 or 1-800-228-9290 
F: 301-822-9201

Hilton Executive Conference Center
1750 Rockville Pike
Rockville, MD 20852 
P: 301-468-11001-800-HILTONS 
F: 301-468-0308

Hyatt Regency Bethesda
One Bethesda Metro Center 
Bethesda, MD 20814
P: 301-657-1234 or 1-800-633-7313
F: 301-657-6453

DoubleTree Hotel
8120 Wisconsin Avenue
Bethesda, Maryland 20814
P: 301-652-2000 or 1-800-222-TREE
F: 301-652-4525

American Inn of Bethesda
8130 Wisconsin Avenue
Bethesda, MD 20814
P: 301-656-9300 or 1-800-232-7081
F: 301-656-2907

Residence Inn
7335 Wisconsin Avenue
Bethesda, MD 20814
P: 301-718-0200 or 1-800-228-9290
F: 301-718-0679

Hilton Garden Inn
7301 Waverly Street
Bethesda, MD 20814
P: 301-654-8111

Taxi Service to Hotel:

From Baltimore/Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport (BWI):
Approximate hotel distance and direction: 35 miles S.W.
Estimated Taxi Fare: $65-$75

From Washington Dulles International Airport (IAD):
Approximate hotel distance and direction: 25 miles N.E.
Estimated Taxi Fare: $55-$65 

From Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport (DCA):
Approximate hotel distance and direction: 21 miles N.E.
Estimated Taxi Fare: $45-$55

Barwood Taxi frequents the NIH campus and can be reached at (301) 984-1900 or (800) 831-2323. All three airports have taxis available and waiting.

Metro to the NIH:

The Metro system is clean and reliable. It operates from 5:00 a.m. to 12:00 midnight Monday through Thursday; 5:00 a.m. to 3:00 a.m. on Fridays; 7:00 a.m. to 3:00 a.m. on Saturdays; and 7:00 a.m. to 12:00 midnight on Sundays. Each passenger must purchase a farecard to travel in the system. Instructions for purchasing farecards are posted on the vending machines in each station. Each Metro car features a complete, color-coded map of the system. Station attendants on duty at each station can provide additional information on request. From Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport, a cost-effective way to travel to the meeting is by using the Metrorail system. A map of the system is available at: http://www.wmata.com/rail/maps/map.cfm  
 

From the Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport station, take the Yellow Line toward Mt. Vernon Square or Fort Totten. At the Gallery/Chinatown stop, transfer to the Red Line toward Shady Grove or Grosvenor-Strathmore. For arrival at the NIH campus, exit at the Medical Center Station, one stop beyond Bethesda. 

The NIH visitor entrance is directly adjacent to the Medical Center Station. Once through security, it is a short walk to Building 31, or you may take the campus shuttle.

SuperShuttle:

SuperShuttle offers service to most hotels from Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport, Washington Dulles International Airport, and Baltimore/Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport. The shuttle leaves on an as-needed basis between the hours of 5:30 a.m. and 11:00 p.m. During other times, arrangements for a shuttle can be made by calling 1-800-258-3826 from the airport, or visit their website at http://supershuttle.com 

NIH Visitor Information:

Building 31C is on Center Drive on the NIH Campus. For a map, general information, and directions to and around the NIH Campus, visit http://www.ors.od.nih.gov/maps/Pages/NIH-Visitor-Map.aspx .

NIH Security:

The NIH, like all federal government facilities, has instituted security measures to ensure the safety of NIH employees, patients, and visitors. The national threat advisory level, determined by the Department of Homeland Security ( http://www.whitehouse.gov/homeland /), currently is yellow (elevated).

Perimeter Security:

All visitor vehicles, including taxicabs, hotel and airport shuttles, delivery trucks, and vans, will be inspected before being allowed on campus. Visitors will be asked to show one (1) form of identification (a government-issued photo ID: driver�s license, passport, green card, etc.) and to state the purpose of their visit. Be sure to allow at least 15-20 minutes for this vehicle inspection procedure.

Building Security:

Due to the checking of IDs at the perimeter, employees and visitors will not be required to show their ID again to gain access to the majority of buildings on the NIH Campus during the normal business day.

Employees and visitors should continue to wear their identification prominently at all times while on campus.

Guards will remain at certain buildings to address specific program requirements, such as sensitive research and safety concerns. At building entrances where guards are posted:

  • Employees must show a DHHS-issued photo ID (for example, your NIH-issued ID badge).
  • Visitors may be required to login, wear a visitor's pass, and be escorted by an employee through the building.
  • Visitors may be required to pass through a metal detector and have bags, backpacks, or purses inspected or x-rayed as they enter buildings.
  • Security staff will confiscate any suspicious or potentially dangerous materials. U.S. code prohibits bringing any dangerous weapons onto federal property, including anything with a blade longer than  

2" inches. Meeting participants may want to leave extra bags or personal materials at their hotel to minimize the time needed for inspection.

Weekday Pedestrian Campus Access:

All visitors must enter through the NIH Gateway Center at the Metro or the West Gateway Center (see the Visitor Map at http://www.ors.od.nih.gov/maps/Pages/NIH-Visitor-Map.aspx ).

  • Gateway Center
    Wisconsin Avenue at Gateway Drive (near the Metro)
    Open 24 hours, 7 days per week
  • West Gateway Center
    Near Old Georgetown Road and South Drive
    Open 6 a.m.-12 p.m., Monday-Friday

Driving Directions to NIH:

From Points North and East:
Take I-95 South to I-495 West (Capital Beltway) toward Silver Spring. Follow I-495 West for 9 miles to Exit 34 (Bethesda/Wisconsin Avenue). Follow signs for Route 355 South and stay in the right lane. Travel approximately 1 mile and turn right at the light onto South Drive. Pass through NIH security and follow the signs to Building 31.
 

From Points North and West:
Take I-270 South to I-495 East (Capital Beltway) toward Washington, DC. Stay in one of the three left lanes. Follow signs for Route 355 South, a left-lane exit, onto Wisconsin Avenue. Travel approximately
1 mile and turn right at the light onto South Drive. Pass through NIH security and follow the signs to Building 31. 

From Points South:
Take I-95 North to I-495 (Capital Beltway) toward Tyson's Corner/Rockville. Follow I-495 for 20 miles. Take Exit 34 (Bethesda/Wisconsin Avenue). Travel approximately 1 mile and turn right at the light onto South Drive. Pass through NIH security and follow the signs to Building 31. 

From Baltimore/Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport (BWI):
Take the Route 195 connector to I-95 South. Take I-95 South to I-495 West (Capital Beltway) toward Silver Spring. Follow I-495 West for 9 miles to Exit 34 (Bethesda/Wisconsin Avenue). Follow signs for Route 355 South and stay in the right lane. Travel approximately 1 mile and turn right at the light onto South Drive. Pass through NIH security and follow the signs to Building 31. 

From Washington Dulles International Airport (IAD):
Take the Dulles Access Road for approximately 13 miles to Exit 18. Move to the right on the Dulles Toll Road (Route 267) and take Exit 18. Stay left on the ramp for Bethesda/Baltimore, and proceed toward Bethesda (I-495). Continue approximately 9 miles on I-495. Stay on I-495 at the I-495/I-270 split (bear right). Take Exit 34 (Wisconsin Avenue South/Route 355) toward Bethesda. Travel approximately
1 mile and turn right at the light onto South Drive. Pass through NIH security and follow the signs to
Building 31. 

From Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport (DCA):
Take the George Washington Parkway North for 12 miles to I-495 toward Maryland (Capital Beltway). Take Exit 34 (Bethesda/Wisconsin Avenue). Travel approximately 1 mile and turn right at the light onto South Drive. Pass through NIH security and follow the signs to Building 31.

Parking:

Parking on the NIH campus is limited and is $12 per day in the visitor lots.

Minutes

​Minutes are currently unavailable.

Attendees

​​Attendees are currently unavailable.

Abstracts

​​Abstracts are currently unavailable.

Location

Line
  • Building 31C, 6th Floor, Conference Room 10
  • National Institutes of Health
  • MD 20892
Webinar

Contacts

Line
For questions concerning program content, please contact:
Maren R. Laughlin, Ph.D.
Senior Advisor for Integrative Metabolism
Division of Diabetes, Endocrinology, and Metabolic Diseases
NIDDK, NIH
Two Democracy Plaza
6707 Democracy Boulevard
Bethesda, MD 20892
Phone: (301) 594-8802
Email: maren.laughlin@nih.gov
 
For questions concerning meeting logistics, please contact:
John Hare, CMP
The Scientific Consulting Group, Inc.
656 Quince Orchard Road, Suite 210
Gaithersburg, MD 20878
Phone: (301) 670-4990
Fax: (301) 670-3815
Email: jhare@scgcorp.com