U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

NIDDK-NCI Workshop on Pancreatitis-Diabetes-Pancreatic Cancer

6/12/2013 7:00 AM
6/13/2013 7:00 AM
 
No
For questions concerning meeting logistics, please contact:  
Denise Hoffman, BIT, CMP
The Scientific Consulting Group, Inc.
Telephone: (301) 670-4990  
Email:  dhoffman@scgcorp.com
Bethesda
 

Event Details

Background:

The etiology of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is poorly understood, and treatment is largely ineffectual because of the advanced stage of disease at presentation. The incidence of PDAC is increasing progressively, such that PDAC may become the leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States by 2050. Although much research is being conducted on the biology and elucidation of possible therapeutic targets for this disease, progress in the prevention and early detection of PDAC has been slow.
 
Risk factors for PDAC include family history, smoking, obesity, chronic pancreatitis (CP), and diabetes mellitus (DM). The recent increase in the prevalence of Type 2 DM (T2DM) is thought to be contributing to a parallel increase in the incidence of PDAC. About one-half of all PDAC patients have DM at the time of diagnosis (an additional 30-40% have impaired glucose tolerance), and roughly one-half of the DM associated with PDAC is new-onset, having developed within 3 years of the subsequent diagnosis of PDAC. This new-onset, tumor-related DM is thought to be secondary or Type 3c DM (T3cDM), according to the American Diabetes Association classification of etiologies of DM.
 
Cohort studies reveal that only 1-2 percent of new-onset adult DM patients will develop PDAC. Screening strategies that target new-onset DM patients for the detection of occult PDAC, therefore, have been infeasible and ineffective. The identification and discrimination of T3cDM from the more prevalent T2DM is an approach that may identify the high-risk group which could allow more successful detection and surveillance methods.
 
Epidemiologic data suggest that different anti-diabetic therapies have differing impacts on the risk of developing PDAC. Laboratory data confirm a beneficial role of metformin in reducing or preventing PDAC, and suggest that GLP-1 receptor agonists may increase the risk of PDAC.
 
In patients with CP complicated by DM, the risk of PDAC is increased more than 30-fold. Despite this increased risk, there are no guidelines for the surveillance of CP patients or for the treatment of their T3cDM, which may affect their risk of developing PDAC.

Purpose:

The purpose of the workshop on Pancreatitis-Diabetes-Pancreatic Cancer is to explore the known and suspected mechanisms for the increased risk for PDAC associated with CP and DM, to identify the prevalence of T3cDM in the overall DM population and to assess strategies to discriminate T3cDM from T2DM, to review the effects of anti-diabetic therapy on the development of PDAC, and to explore possible PDAC surveillance methods for T2DM and T3cDM patients. Participants will develop a series of opportunities and priorities that could inform further research efforts sponsored by both NIDDK and NCI.

Who Should Attend?

 
Clinicians, investigators, post-doctoral fellows, and graduate students interested in pancreatic disease, diabetes, and pancreatic cancer.

Potential Topics:

  • Overview of the Problem (increase in PDAC incidence and its relationship to CP and DM)
  • Chronic Pancreatitis as a Risk Factor for PDAC
  • Diabetes as a Risk Factor for PDAC
  • Keynote Lecture on Genomic Associations of CP, DM, and PDAC
  • Effects of DM Treatment on PDAC
  • Pancreatogenic (Type 3c) Diabetes
  • Surveillance of High-risk Populations and Early Detection of PDAC

Chairs:

  • Gloria Petersen (Mayo Clinic); and
  • David Whitcomb (University of Pittsburgh)

Organization Committee:

  • Dana K. Andersen, M.D. Director, Clinical Studies Program, DDN, NIDDK
  • Michael C. Appel, Ph.D. Director, Islet Biology and Transplant Program, DEM, NIDDK
  • Thomas L. Eggerman, M.D., Ph.D. Director, Clinical Islet Transplantation Program, DEM, NIDDK
  • James (Jay) Everhart, M.D., M.P.H. Director, Epidemiology Programs, DDN, NIDDK
  • Maren Laughlin, Ph.D. Director, Metabolism and Insulin Resistance Program, DEM, NIDDK
  • Jane Holt, Co-Founder, National Pancreas Foundation; Adv Council NIDDK
  • Saul Malozowski, M.D., Ph.D. Director, Endocrine Physiology Program, DEM, NIDDK
  • Padma Maruvada, Ph.D. Director, Nutrition and Clinical Obesity Program, DDN, NIDDK
  • Gloria M. Petersen, Ph.D. (Co-Chair) Tabor Professor of Epidemiology, Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic
  • Daniela Seminara, Ph.D., M.P.H. Coordinator, Senior Scientist and Cohort and Consortia Coordination Team Lead, EGRP, DCCPS, NCI​
  • Jose Serrano, M.D., Ph.D. Director, Pancreas Program, DDN, NIDDK
  • Jill P. Smith, M.D., Director, Clinical and Translational Research in Digestive Diseases, NIDDK
  • Rachel Stolzenberg-Solomon, Ph.D., M.P.H. Senior Investigator, Nutritional Epidemiology Branch, DCEG, NCI
  • Mukesh Verma, Ph.D. Methods and Technologies Branch, EGRP, DCCPS, NCI
  • Paul Wagner, Ph.D., Cancer Biomarkers Research Group, DCP, NCI​
  • David C. Whitcomb, M.D., Ph.D. (Co-Chair) Eagle Foundation Professor and Chief, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University of Pittsburgh

Sponsors:

  • National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK)
  • National Cancer Institute (NCI)

Agenda

Wednesday, June 12, 2013

7:30 a.m. Registration and Poster Set-up
8:15 a.m. Introduction
Gloria Petersen and David Whitcomb
8:25 a.m. Welcome
Griffin P. Rodgers and Douglas R. Lowy

Session 1: Overview of the Problem

8:30 a.m. Pancreatic Cancer: The Problem
Margaret Tempero

Session 2: Chronic Pancreatitis as a Risk Factor for PDAC

Moderator/Discussant: Eric Duell

9:00 a.m. Epidemiology of PDAC Risk in CP Populations
Albert Lowenfels
9:25 a.m. Mechanisms of CP-induced PDAC
David Whitcomb
9:50 a.m. Role of Stellate Cell Activation In PDAC
Rosa Hwang
10:15 a.m. Role of CCK In PDAC Development
Jill P. Smith
10:40 a.m. Summary
10:55 a.m. Break

Session 3: Diabetes as a Risk Factor for PDAC

Moderator/Discussant: Craig Logsdon

11:15 a.m. Associations Between Obesity, Diabetes, and PDAC
Rachael Stolzenberg-Solomon
11:40 a.m. Effect of Combined CP and DM Risks on PDAC Development
Vinciane Rebours
12:05 p.m. Mechanisms of DM-induced PDAC
Michael Pollak
12:30 p.m. Role of PDX-1 in PDAC Development
Chuck Brunicardi
12:55 p.m. Summary
1:10 p.m. Lunch and Poster Viewing

Session 4: Pancreatogenic (Type 3c) Diabetes

Moderator/Discussant: Åke Andren-Sandberg

2:40 p.m. Classification and Prevalence of T3cDM in CP and PDAC
Nils Ewald
3:05 p.m. Discrimination From T2DM and Management of T3cDM
Michael Rickels
3:30 p.m. Mechanism(s) of PDAC-induced T3cDM
Suresh Chari
3:55 p.m The Role of Pancreatic Polypeptide in T3cDM
Dana Andersen
4:20 p.m. Summary
Keynote Lecture
4:35 p.m. Genomic Associations of CP, DM, and PDAC
Gloria Petersen
5:05 p.m. General Discussion Overview of Day 1
Moderator: David Whitcomb
5:30 p.m. Adjournment

Thursday, June 13, 2013

7:30 a.m. Registration

Session 5: Surveillance of High-risk Populations and Early Detection of PDAC

Moderator/Discussant: Michael Goggins
8:00 a.m. Biomarker Development for PDAC
Tony Hollingsworth
8:25 a.m. Identification and Methods of Surveillance of High-risk Populations
Teri Brentnall
8:50 a.m. Radiologic and Cytogenetic Detection of Pre-malignant Pancreatic Lesions
Mimi Canto
9:15 a.m. Follow-up or Resection of Suspicious Lesions in High-risk Patients
Thomas Gress
9:40 a.m. Cost-benefit Analysis of Screening and Intervention in High-risk Patients
Randall Brand
10:05 a.m. Summary
10:20 a.m. Break

Session 6: Effects of DM Treatment on PDAC

Moderator/Discussant: Murray Korc

10:45 a.m. Diabetic Pharmacotherapy Associations With PDAC
Donghui Li
11:10 a.m. Mechanisms of the Trophic Effects of GLP-1 and DPP-4 Inhibitors
Josephine Egan
11:35 a.m. Incretin-mimetic Associations With PDAC
Peter Butler
12:00 p.m. PDAC Incidence with Liraglutide Therapy
Alan Moses
12:25 p.m. Incidence of Pancreatitis and PDAC in Clinical Studies of Sitagliptin
Sam Engel
12:50 p.m. Summary
1:00 p.m. Lunch
1:30 p.m. Pitfalls of Studies of Adverse Drug Effects
Yu-Xiao Yang
1:55 p.m. FDA Surveillance of Adverse Drug Effects
Tim Hummer and Solomon Iyasu
2:20 p.m. Panel Discussion
Moderator: Judith Fradkin
2:50 p.m. General Discussion and Overview Day 2
3:00 p.m. Adjournment

Directions/Travel

Travel Arrangements

Participants are responsible for making their own travel arrangements. Should you decide to extend your stay to take advantage of lower fares, DC-area attractions are only a short stop away from the suggested hotels.
Hotel and travel information are listed below.

Hotel Reservations

The following hotels provide lodging in close proximity that is accessible by taxi.
 
American Inn of Bethesda
8130 Wisconsin Avenue
Bethesda, MD 20814
P: (301) 656-9300 or 1-800-232-7081
F: (301) 656-2907
 
Bethesda Marriott Hotel
5151 Pooks Hill Road
Bethesda, MD 20814
P: (301) 897-9400 or 1-800-228-9290
F: (301) 897-0192
 
Bethesda North Marriott Hotel and Conference Center
5701 Marinelli Road
North Bethesda, MD 20852
P: (301) 822-9200 or 1-800-228-9290
F: (301) 822-9201
DoubleTree Hotel
8120 Wisconsin Avenue
Bethesda, MD 20814
P: (301) 652-2000 or 1-800-222-TREE
F: (301) 652-4525
 
Hilton Executive Conference Center
1750 Rockville Pike
Rockville, MD 20852
P: (301) 468-1100 or 1-800-HILTONS
F: (301) 468-0308
Hilton Garden Inn
7301 Waverly Street
Bethesda, MD 20814
P: (301) 654-8111
 
Hyatt Regency Bethesda
One Bethesda Metro Center
Bethesda, MD 20814
P: (301) 657-1234 or 1-800-633-7313
F: (301) 657-6453
 
Residence Inn
7335 Wisconsin Avenue
Bethesda, MD 20814
P: (301) 718-0200 or 1-800-228-9290
F: (301) 718-0679
 
The Legacy Hotel
1775 Rockville Pike
Rockville, MD 20852
P: (301) 231-8800
F: (301) 881-9047
 

Taxi Service to Area Hotels

From Baltimore/Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport (BWI):
Approximate hotel distance and direction: 35 miles S.W.
Estimated Taxi Fare: $60
 
From Washington Dulles International Airport (IAD):
Approximate hotel distance and direction: 25 miles N.E.
Estimated Taxi Fare: $50
 
From Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport (DCA):
Approximate hotel distance and direction: 21 miles N.E.
Estimated Taxi Fare: $45
 
Fares may differ during peak travel hours.

Metro to the Hotel

The Metrorail system is clean and reliable. It operates from 5:00 a.m. to 12:00 midnight Monday through Thursday; 5:00 a.m. to 3:00 a.m. on Fridays; 7:00 a.m. to 3:00 a.m. on Saturdays; and 7:00 a.m. to 12:00 midnight on Sundays. Each passenger must purchase a farecard to travel in the system. Instructions for purchasing farecards are posted on the vending machines at each station. Each Metrorail car features a complete color-coded map of the system. Station attendants on duty at each station can provide additional information on request.
From Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport, a cost-effective way to travel to the meeting is by using the Metrorail system. A map of the system is available at: http://www.wmata.com/rail/maps/map.cfm. From the Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport station, take the Yellow Line toward Mt. Vernon Square or Fort Totten. At the Gallery/Chinatown stop, transfer to the Red Line toward Shady Grove or Grosvenor-Strathmore. Please see the following list of hotels and respective Metrorail stations.
 
Bethesda Station – Hyatt Regency, Residence Inn, Hilton Garden Inn
Medical Center Station – American Inn, DoubleTree, Bethesda Marriott (call for hotel shuttle)
White Flint Station – Bethesda Marriott North Hotel and Conference Center
Twinbrook Hilton and Legacy

SuperShuttle

SuperShuttle offers service to most hotels from Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport, Washington Dulles International Airport, and Baltimore/Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport. The shuttle leaves on an as-needed basis between the hours of 5:30 a.m. and 11:00 p.m. During other times, arrangements for a shuttle can be made by calling 1-800-258-3826 from the airport, or by visiting their website at http://supershuttle.com.

NIH Visitor Information

The Lister Hill Auditorium is located on the NIH Campus in Building 38A. For a map, general information, and directions to and around the NIH Campus, visit http://parking.nih.gov/visitor_access_map.htm .

NIH Security

The NIH, like all federal government facilities, has instituted security measures to ensure the safety of NIH employees, patients, and visitors. The national threat advisory level, determined by the Department of Homeland Security ( http://www.whitehouse.gov/homeland /), currently is yellow (elevated).

Perimeter Security

All visitor vehicles, including taxicabs, hotel and airport shuttles, delivery trucks, and vans will be inspected before being allowed on campus. Visitors will be asked to show one (1) form of identification (a government-issued photo ID: driver's license, passport, green card, etc.) and to state the purpose of their visit. Please allow at least 15 to 20 minutes for this vehicle inspection procedure.

Building Security

Due to the checking of IDs at the perimeter, employees and visitors will not be required to show their ID again to gain access to the majority of the buildings on the NIH Campus during the normal business day.
 
Employees and visitors should continue to wear their identification prominently at all times while on campus.
 
Guards will remain at certain buildings to address specific program requirements, such as sensitive research and safety concerns. At building entrances where guards are posted:
  • Employees must show a DHHS-issued photo ID (for example, your NIH-issued ID badge).
  • Visitors may be required to log-in, wear a visitor's pass, and be escorted by an employee through the building.
  • Visitors may be required to pass through a metal detector and have bags, backpacks, or purses inspected or X-rayed as they enter buildings.
  • Security staff will confiscate any suspicious or potentially dangerous materials. U.S. code prohibits bringing any dangerous weapons onto federal property, including anything with a blade longer than 2½ inches. Meeting participants may want to leave extra bags or personal materials at their hotel to minimize the time needed for inspection.

Weekday Pedestrian Campus Access

All visitors must enter through the NIH Gateway Center at the Medical Center Metro stop or the West Gateway Center (see the Visitor Map at http://parking.nih.gov/visitor_access_map.htm ).
  • Gateway Center
    Wisconsin Avenue at Gateway Drive (near the Metro)
    Open 24 hours, 7 days per week
  • West Gateway Center
    Near Old Georgetown Road and South Drive
    Open 6 a.m. to 12 p.m., Monday through Friday

Driving Directions to NIH

From Points North and East:
Take I-95 South to I-495 West (Capital Beltway) toward Silver Spring. Follow I-495 West for 9 miles to Exit 34 (Bethesda/Wisconsin Avenue). Follow signs for Route 355 South and stay in the right lane. Travel approximately 1 mile and turn right at the light onto South Drive. Pass through NIH security and follow the signs to Building 38A.
 
From Points North and West:
Take I-270 South to I-495 East (Capital Beltway) toward Washington, DC. Stay in one of the three left lanes. Follow signs for Route 355 South, a left-lane exit, onto Wisconsin Avenue. Travel approximately 1 mile and turn right at the light onto South Drive. Pass through NIH security and follow the signs to Building 38A.
 
From Points South:
Take I-95 North to I-495 (Capital Beltway) toward Tyson's Corner/Rockville. Follow I-495 for 20 miles. Take Exit 34 (Bethesda/Wisconsin Avenue). Travel approximately 1 mile and turn right at the light onto South Drive. Pass through NIH security and follow the signs to Building 38A.
 
From Baltimore/Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport (BWI):
Take the Route 195 connector to I-95 South. Take I-95 South to I-495 West (Capital Beltway) toward Silver Spring. Follow I-495 West for 9 miles to Exit 34 (Bethesda/Wisconsin Avenue). Follow signs for Route 355 South and stay in the right lane. Travel approximately 1 mile and turn right at the light onto South Drive. Pass through NIH security and follow the signs to Building 38A.
 
From Washington Dulles International Airport (IAD):
Take the Dulles Access Road for approximately 13 miles to Exit 18. Move to the right lane on the Dulles Toll Road (Route 267) and take Exit 18. Stay left on the ramp for Bethesda/Baltimore, and proceed toward Bethesda (I-495). Continue approximately 9 miles on I-495. Stay on I-495 at the I-495/I-270 split (bear right). Take Exit 34 (Wisconsin Avenue South/Route 355) toward Bethesda. Travel approximately 1 mile and turn right at the light onto South Drive. Pass through NIH security and follow the signs to Building 38A.
 
From Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport (DCA):
Take the George Washington Parkway North for 12 miles to I-495 (Capital Beltway) toward Maryland. Take Exit 34 (Bethesda/Wisconsin Avenue). Travel approximately 1 mile and turn right at the light onto South Drive. Pass through NIH security and follow the signs to Building 38A.

Parking

Parking on the NIH campus is limited and costs $12 per day in the visitor lots. The closest visitor lot is the Gateway Parking Garage (MLP-11) located at the Gateway Drive entrance. From here, it is a 5 minute walk to the building. The NIH Campus shuttle is also an option, which runs every 15 minutes.
NIDDK, DHHS, NIH, NCI, and Pancreatic Cancer Action Network logos  

Minutes

​Minutes are currently unavailable.

Attendees

​​Attendees are currently unavailable.

Abstracts

Abstract Submission (Open to all Investigators)

Abstracts should be limited to one page. Include a title, all authors (presenting author should be clearly underlined), departmental affiliation, university, city, state/province, country, zip code/postal code, and email address, along with sufficient experimental detail to assess the relevance of the work. Please acknowledge appropriate funding sources for your research. Inclusion of figures is encouraged. In addition to sending us your abstract, please check the "I will be submitting an abstract" button when you register for the workshop. There is no fee for registration.
  1. The abstract should be typed single-spaced to fit standard abstract measurements using type no smaller than 10 point (12 cpi). The presentation title should be typed in CAPITAL LETTERS and should duplicate the title of your poster. The title should be followed in lowercase letters by the author�s first and last names, degree, affiliation (if applicable), city, state, and country, beginning on the next line. Do not leave spaces between the title, author information, and the body of the abstract, or between paragraphs. Indent first line of the body of the abstract three spaces. The abstract file should be saved as: author�s last name_first word in the title (e.g., Zucker_Effects). Up to 5 selected references may be included in abbreviated format (first author last name, journal, year, volume, first page number).
  2. Organize the abstract into 4 sections, with the subheadings  Introduction, Methods, Results, and Conclusions. Leave no extra space between the sections
  3. Please ensure that your abstract together with any references is no more than 1 page in length. Set the margins to the following using Microsoft Word: Top 1"; Bottom 1"; Left 1"; Right 1".
  4. Use of standard abbreviations is desirable (e.g., RBC). Use kg, gm, mg, mL, L, and %. Place a special or unusual abbreviation in parentheses after the full word the first time that it appears. Use numerals to indicate numbers except to begin sentences. Simple tables or graphs may be included; however, they must fit within the designated abstract space.
  5. Please use a common font such as Helvetica, Times New Roman, or Arial.
Example
BENEFICIAL EFFECT OF RED WINE CONSUMPTION ON THE INCIDENCE OF PANCREATIC DUCTAL ADENOCARCINOMA (PDAC) IN OCTAGENARIANS
Introduction  Resveratrol (RES), a polyphenol found in red grapes, has been found

Please email your abstract to dhoffman@scgcorp.com  by  April 19, 2013.

Location

Line
  • Lister Hill Auditorium
  • Building 38A, NIH Campus
  • MD 20892
Webinar

Contacts

Line
For questions concerning meeting logistics, please contact:  
Denise Hoffman, BIT, CMP
The Scientific Consulting Group, Inc.
Telephone: (301) 670-4990  
Email:  dhoffman@scgcorp.com