U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

The Interface Between the Nervous and the Immune System in the Pathogenesis of Autoimmune Diabetes

6/15/2011 7:00 AM
6/15/2011 7:00 AM
 
No
For questions concerning program content, contact:
Guillermo Arreaza-Rubin, M.D.
Telephone:  (301) 594-4724
Email: arreaza-rubing@niddk.nih.gov
Beena Akolkar, Ph.D.
Telephone:  (301) 594-8812
Email​
 
For questions concerning meeting logistics, contact:
John Hare, M.S., CMP
Telephone:  (301) 670-4990
Email: jhare@scgcorp.com
Bethesda
 

Event Details

The purpose of this workshop is to gain knowledge on the state-of-the-art and perspectives on the role of the central and peripheral nervous system on the pathogenesis and modulation of the inflammatory process that leads to selective beta cell destruction in type 1 diabetes (T1D) and also how the inflammatory process may affect neural control of islet cells function. 

Background and Justification: 

T1D is thought to be caused by an immune system that has failed to maintain tolerance to self antigens expressed by the insulin-producing beta cell. For T1D, the currently known self antigens are mainly expressed in beta cells and some are also present elsewhere in the body, including neuronal antigens. There is some evidence for functional interactions between the nervous system and the immune system but the connections between islet autoimmunity and nervous system function are not known. Thus, this workshop will help shed light on the role of the central and peripheral nervous system on the pathogenesis and modulation of the inflammatory process that leads to selective beta cell destruction in T1D and also how the inflammatory process may affect neural control of islet cells function. Elucidation of these mechanisms could open new avenues for biomarkers or therapeutics. 

Research Goals and Objectives: 

To discuss the role of the central and peripheral nervous system on the pathogenesis and modulation of the inflammatory process that leads to selective beta cell destruction in T1D and determine the effect of inflammation on neural control of islet cells function. The main questions that would be addressed are the following:
  1. Does autoimmunity target the islet efferent and afferent innervation, does it induce an islet neuropathy, and does it influence autoreactivity against β cells?
  2. Are neurotransmiters/neuropeptides important for β cell function, neogenesis, or regeneration?
  3. Do signals from the nervous system alter inflammation and insulin resistance?
  4. Does islet inflammation modulate islet innervation and neural function?
  5. What is the role of innervation in the defective counter-regulatory response that is seen in T1D?
  6. Are there other examples of neural involvement in tissue targeting in autoimmunity that could illuminate pathogenesis in T1D?  
Understanding the role of the central and peripheral nervous system in T1D pathogenesis is likely to provide crucial new insights into disease pathogenesis.

Organizing Committee:

Co-Chairs:

Alejandro Caicedo, Ph.D., University of Miami
Hans-Michael Dosch, M.D., Ph.D., University of Toronto
Gerald Taborsky, Jr., Ph.D., University of Washington

NIDDK:

Beena Akolkar, Ph.D., NIDDK, NIH 
Michael Appel, Ph.D., NIDDK, NIH 
Guillermo Arreaza-Rubin, M.D., NIDDK, NIH
Lisa Spain, Ph.D., NIDDK, NIH

Agenda

7:30 - 8:00 a.m. Registration

Introductory Lecture

8:00 - 8:30 a.m.
Histopathology of Type 1 Diabetes in Pancreata from Cadaveric Organ Donors Objectives  
Matthias von Herrath, M.D., Ph.D.

Session A:  Influence of the Nervous System on Immune Responses - Possible Implications for Autoimmune Diabetes  

Chair:         Hans-Michael Dosch, M.D., Ph.D.

8:30 - 9:00 a.m.
A Role for Sensory Nerves in Islet Immune Responses  
Hans-Michael Dosch, M.D., Ph.D.
9:00 - 9:30 a.m.
Neurons:  Major Negative Regulators of Activated T cells
Shohreh Issazadeh-Navikas, Ph.D.
9:30 - 10:00 a.m.
Glutamate as a Regulator of Adaptive Immunity
Ursula Grohmann, Ph.D.
10:00 - 10:15 a.m. Break
10:15 - 10:45 a.m.
The Inflammatory Reflex  
Kevin Tracey, M.D.
10:45 - 11:15 a.m. Sympathetic-Immune Modulation and Autoimmunity:  Lessons Learned from Autoimmune Arthritis
Denise Bellinger, Ph.D.
11:15 - 11:45 a.m.   Questions and Roundtable Discussion
11:45 a.m. - 12:45 p.m. Lunch   (on your own)

Session B:  Neural Dysfunction in Diabetes  

Chairs:       Alejandro Caicedo, Ph.D. and Gerald Taborsky, Jr., Ph.D.

Introductory Lectures
12:45 - 1:15 p.m.
Neural Control of the Pancreatic Islet
Alejandro Caicedo, Ph.D.
1:15 - 1:45 p.m.
Serotoninergic Pathways and cell Proliferation/Regeneration  
Michael German, M.D.

Session B1:  Islet Neural Dysfunction in Diabetes:  Role of Autoimmunity  

Chair:           Alejandro Caicedo, Ph.D.

1:45 - 2:15 p.m. Peri-Islet Glia in Autoimmune Type 1 Diabetes
Hubert Tsui, Ph.D.
2:15 - 2:45 p.m.
Immune Mediated Loss of Islet Sympathetic Nerves and Impairment of Glucagon Secretion  
Gerald Taborsky, Jr., Ph.D.
2:45 - 3:15 p.m.
Lymphocyte Autoimmune Response to Nervous System Elements in the Course of Type 1 Diabetes
Joan Verdaguer, M.D., Ph.D.
3:15 - 3:30 p.m. Break
Session B2:  Neural Dysfunction in Diabetes:  Role of Insulin Deficiency and Hyperglycemia  
Chair:           Gerald Taborsky, Jr., Ph.D.
3:30 - 4:15 p.m.
Dysfunction of the Hypothalamic-Islet Axis in Diabetes  
Robert Sherwin, M.D.
4:15 - 4:45 p.m.
Vagal Contribution to Metabolic Homeostasis in Humans
Karen Teff, Ph.D.
4:45 - 5:15 p.m.
Diabetes-induced Dysfunction of Ganglionic Neurotransmission
Ellis Cooper, Ph.D.

Final Discussion

5:15 p.m.
Therapeutic Implications
Possible Research Initiatives in This Field

Directions/Travel

​Travel Arrangements 

Travel arrangements are your own responsibility, but you should know that three airports serve the Washington, DC, metropolitan area.Please make your own hotel reservations.
 
Some nearby hotels include (in order of proximity to the meeting location):
Bethesda North Marriott Hotel and Conference Center,  (301) 822-9200, 5701 Marinelli Road, Bethesda, MD
Bethesda Marriott Suites, (301) 897-5600, 6711 Democracy Boulevard, Bethesda, MD 
Hilton Washington DC/Rockville Executive Meeting Center,  (301) 468-1100, 1750 Rockville Pike, Rockville, MD
Bethesda Marriott,  (301) 897-0192, 5151 Pooks Hill Road, Bethesda, MD
Doubletree Bethesda Hotel and Executive Meeting Center,  (301) 652-2000, 8120 Wisconsin Avenue, Bethesda, MD  
Bethesda Court,  (301) 656-2100, 7740 Wisconsin Avenue, Bethesda, MD
American Inn - Bethesda,  (301) 656-9300, 8130 Wisconsin Avenue, Bethesda, MD
Hilton Garden Inn,  (301) 654-8111, 7301 Waverly Street, Bethesda, MD 
Hyatt Regency Bethesda,  (301) 657-1234, 7400 Wisconsin Avenue, Bethesda, MD

Metro to the NSC

The Metro system is clean and reliable. It operates from 5:00 a.m. to 12:00 midnight Monday through Thursday; 5:00 a.m. to 3:00 a.m. on Fridays; 7:00 a.m. to 3:00 a.m. on Saturdays; and 7:00 a.m. to 12:00 midnight on Sundays. Each passenger must purchase a farecard to travel in the system. Instructions for purchasing farecards are posted on the vending machines in each station. Each Metro car features a complete color-coded map of the system. Station attendants on duty at each station can provide additional information on request. From Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport, a cost-effective way to travel to the meeting is by using the Metrorail system. A map of the system is available at: http://www.wmata.com/rail/maps/map.cfm.
 
From any point in the Metro system, take the Red Line toward Shady Grove. Exit from the Medical Center station. At the Metro station look for the NIH shuttle stop and take the free NIH shuttle "Executive Plaza" route that drops you off in front of building 6001.
Or take the Red Line toward Shady Grove and exit instead at the White Flint station (which is two stops from the Medical Center station). The NSC building is a 10-minute walk from the White Flint station. As you exit the station, find Marinelli Road and walk west toward Executive Boulevard.
 
Or you can board a Ride-On bus (routes 5, 26, or 81) for service along Executive Boulevard. These routes stop at the driveway entrance to the NSC building and from there it is a short walk to the building.

SuperShuttle

SuperShuttle offers service to most hotels from Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport, Washington Dulles International Airport, and Baltimore/Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport. The shuttle leaves on an as-needed basis between the hours of 5:30 a.m. and 11:00 p.m. During other times, arrangements for a shuttle can be made by calling 1-800-258-3826 from the airport, or by visiting their website at http://supershuttle.com

Driving Directions to the NSC

From Points North
Take I-95 South to I-495 West (Capital Beltway) toward Silver Spring, then take Exit 34 (Route 355 North, Wisconsin Avenue/Rockville Pike). Drive approximately 2.4 miles and turn left onto Old Georgetown Road. At the second light, turn right onto Executive Boulevard. The building is on your immediate right and visitor parking is at the second driveway entrance.
OR
Take I-95 south toward Washington, DC. At I-495 (Capital Beltway), head west toward Silver Spring/
Bethesda. From the Beltway (I-495), take Exit 36 (Old Georgetown Road), heading north for about 1.3 miles. Turn left onto Executive Boulevard. The building is on your immediate right and visitor parking is at the second driveway entrance.
 
From Points South
Take I-95 North to I-495 North/East (Capital Beltway) toward Rockville/Tysons Corner and travel across the river into Maryland. Bear left onto I-270 North toward Frederick. Proceed approximately 3 miles to Montrose Road (East) Exit 4A. Drive 1.5 miles (3rd stop light). Turn right onto Executive Boulevard. Proceed for 1/2 mile. The NSC building is on your left.
 
From Baltimore/Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport (BWI)
Take Route 195 West to Exit 4 (I-95 South), then head west on I-495 (Capital Beltway) toward Silver Spring. Take Exit 34 (Route 355 North, Wisconsin Avenue/Rockville Pike). Drive approximately 2.4 miles and turn left onto Old Georgetown Road. At the second light, turn right onto Executive Boulevard. The NSC building is on your immediate right.
 
From Washington Dulles International Airport (IAD)
Travel on the Dulles Access Road (Route 267 East) for approximately 13 miles to Exit 18. Move to the right on the Dulles Toll Road (Route 267) and take Exit 18. Stay left on the ramp for Bethesda/Baltimore and proceed toward Bethesda on I-495 (Capital Beltway). Travel approximately 9 miles on I-495. Bear left onto I-270 North toward Frederick. Proceed approximately 3 miles to Montrose Road (east) Exit 4A. Drive 1.5 miles (3rd stop light). Turn right onto Executive Boulevard. Proceed for 1/2 mile. The NSC building is on your left.
 
From Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport (DCA)
Take the George Washington Parkway (Route 110 North) to I-495 (Capital Beltway) North toward Maryland. Bear left onto I-270 North toward Frederick. Stay to the right and bear off to the "Connector/Distributor" lanes. Exit at Montrose Road (East). Drive approximately 1.5 miles and either:
Turn right onto Rockville Pike. Turn right at the second traffic light onto Old Georgetown Road. At the second light, turn right onto Executive Boulevard. The NSC building is on your immediate right.
OR
Turn right onto Executive Boulevard, drive approximately 1/2 mile and make a "U" turn at the intersection of Old Georgetown Road and Executive Boulevard. The NSC building is on your immediate right.

Security at the NSC Building 

Non-NIH employees will be required to show a picture ID and to have their bags searched to enter the NSC; building security will then issue you a visitor badge. Pay parking is readily available at this location. Please plan to arrive 10-15 minutes prior to the meeting start time to allow for the security process.

Parking

If you are driving to the NSC, please note that the visitor parking entrance is at the second driveway traveling from east to west. The first driveway is accessible only to NIH employees with fascards. Also note that the visitor parking lot is a paid facility operated by PMI ― up to the first 1/2 hour is free, the first hour is $2, and each additional hour is $1 up to the maximum $7/day. This rate is subject to change.

Transportation 

For transportation from the Metropolitan Washington Airports:  
  
Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport (703-685-1400)  
Washington Dulles International Airport (703-685-1400)  
Baltimore/Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport (BWI) (800-435-9294<) 

Taxi Service

From Baltimore/Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport (BWI):
Approximate distance and direction to Rockville/Bethesda:  35 miles SW
Estimated Taxi Fare:  $55-$65
 
From Washington Dulles International Airport (IAD):
Approximate distance and direction to Rockville/Bethesda:  25 miles NE
Estimated Taxi Fare:  $55-$65
 
From Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport (DCA):
Approximate distance and direction to Rockville/Bethesda:  21 miles NE
Estimated Taxi Fare:  $45-$50
 
Fares may differ during peak travel hours.

Minutes

​Minutes are currently unavailable.

Attendees

​​Attendees are currently unavailable.

Abstracts

​Abstracts are currently unavailable.

Location

Line
  • Neuroscience Center, Room C
  • 6001 Executive Boulevard
  • MD 20892
Webinar

Contacts

LineFor questions concerning program content, contact:
Guillermo Arreaza-Rubin, M.D.
Telephone:  (301) 594-4724
Email: arreaza-rubing@niddk.nih.gov
Beena Akolkar, Ph.D.
Telephone:  (301) 594-8812
Email​
 
For questions concerning meeting logistics, contact:
John Hare, M.S., CMP
Telephone:  (301) 670-4990
Email: jhare@scgcorp.com