U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Activities

Quality Improvement/Evidence of Therapy

This section describes how the federal government is using evidence-based therapy to improve the quality of chronic kidney disease programs.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)​

CDC's Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) Health Evaluation Risk Information Sharing (CHERISH) project was designed to test if it is practicable to put into action a CKD screening and detection program in four states. This project assessed the degree of kidney disease in a high-risk population, determined participants’ access to health care, and addressed the likelihood of disease progression in patients with CKD. This study was conducted in collaboration with the National Kidney Foundation and will provide information on how to target this population for CKD screening and how public health officials could implement simpler, more efficient protocols for future CKD screening programs.

Contact Information
Nilka Ríos Burrows, MPH, MT (ASCP)
CKD Initiative Acting Team Lead
CDC Division of Diabetes Translation
Phone: 770-488-1057
E-mail: nrios@cdc.gov
Website: http://www.cdc.gov/ckd

CDC is conducting bloodstream infection (BSI) surveillance and promoting BSI prevention among hemodialysis facilities. CDC’s Dialysis BSI Prevention Collaborative is a partnership of freestanding and hospital-based outpatient dialysis facilities across the country aimed at preventing BSIs in hemodialysis patients. CDC provides evidence-based prevention guidelines and access to the National Healthcare Safety Network, a surveillance system that allows facilities to track infections. Also, CDC has developed for both patients and providers educational tools and materials to prevent dialysis-associated infections and supports the Making Dialysis Safer Coalition.

Contact Information
Priti Patel, MD, MPH
CDC Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion
Phone: 404-639-4273
E-mail: PPatel@cdc.gov
Website: http://www.cdc.gov/ckd
http://www.cdc.gov/dialysis

CDC's cost-effectiveness studies are using a lifetime microsimulation model to assess the costs of the increasing burden of CKD and the cost of screening and treatment interventions for CKD and its complications. The model is being continuously updated to predict the contemporary progression of CKD and test the long-term effectiveness of various public health interventions; such as, best CKD screening scenarios and recommended treatment targets for anemia or hypertension among people with CKD. These studies will help to efficiently use public health resources to prevent and control CKD.

Contact Information
Meda Pavkov, MD, PhD
Phone: 770-488-1160
E-mail: MPavkov@cdc.gov
Website: http://www.cdc.gov/ckd

Last Updated: July 6, 2016

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Scientific Research

This section describes basic and clinical research activities supported or sponsored by the federal government.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

CDC conducts numerous epidemiologic studies to determine risk factors for incidence and progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and to research the burden of CKD in the general population and in special populations (e.g., mortality among people with CKD and incidence of kidney failure among people with diabetes, among other topics).

CDC, in collaboration with the Veterans Affairs—Puget Sound Health Care System, is using CKD progression models to evaluate the natural history of the disease. The study aims to 1) estimate the rate of progression through the stages of CKD and the development of complications; 2) look at comorbidities and risk factors associated with disease progression and rate of progression to kidney failure; and 3) develop a comorbidity index to serve as prognostic tool in identifying CKD patients at high risk of progression to kidney failure.

Contact Information
Nilka Ríos Burrows, MPH, MT (ASCP)
CKD Initiative Acting Team Lead
CDC Division of Diabetes Translation
Phone: 770-488-1057
E-mail: nrios@cdc.gov
Website: http://www.cdc.gov/ckd

CDC’s Longitudinal Study of Markers of Kidney Disease is a collaboration with the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases of the National Institutes of Health (NIH/NIDDK) to investigate using new kidney disease markers to diagnose early kidney function decline. The project aims to validate new kidney markers as early indicators of kidney disease to 1) improve diagnosis criteria for early kidney disease in high-risk populations; 2) advance prevention and treatment of CKD in patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes, or elderly patients, for whom no current accurate marker of kidney disease is available; and 3) estimate the public health burden and trends of CKD.

Contact Information
Meda Pavkov, MD, PhD
Phone: 770-488-1160
E-mail: MPavkov@cdc.gov
Website: http://www.cdc.gov/ckd

Last Updated: July 6, 2016

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Professional Education & Outreach

This section describes what the federal government is doing to educate health professionals about chronic kidney disease programs.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

The Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) Initiative provides public health strategies to promote kidney health. CDC disseminates CKD prevention messages via social media and GovDelivery “Are You Aware?” e-mails throughout the year, and in particular in conjunction with public health events such as March Is Kidney Month. In addition, CDC showcases the work of the CKD Initiative at professional conferences and meetings.

CDC works in close collaboration with the National Kidney Disease Education Program of the National Institutes of Health (NIH/NKDEP) to disseminate CKD prevention messages via CDC channels such as CDC’s CKD Initiative website, CDC’s Division of Diabetes Translation Facebook and Twitter accounts, and CDC’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR). In the MMWR and in peer review journals, CDC has published articles related to CKD in the United States. In addition, CDC publishes the National Chronic Kidney Disease Fact Sheet pdf , a collaborative effort of CDC, other federal agencies, universities, and nonprofit organizations. The fact sheet provides information to the public, kidney health advocates, and researchers on CKD prevalence, health consequences, risk factors, and prevention and treatment strategies. The fact sheet is not subject to copyright restrictions and can be duplicated, adapted, and distributed freely. CDC has also published the Chronic Kidney Disease Issue Brief that is intended to increase the visibility of the CKD Initiative and educate public health officials, medical practitioners, and policy makers about CDC’s role in preventing CKD. This 12-page pamphlet highlights the activities and achievements of CDC’s CKD Initiative in promoting kidney health and outlines a path for the future.

Contact Information
Nilka Ríos Burrows, MPH, MT (ASCP)
CKD Initiative Team Lead
CDC Division of Diabetes Translation
Phone: 770-488-1057
E-mail: nrios@cdc.gov
Website: http://www.cdc.gov/ckd

Website: http://www.cdc.gov/diabetes/pubs/pdf/kidney_Factsheet.pdf pdf

Last Updated: July 6, 2016

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Surveillance

This section describes surveillance activities and programs of the federal government related to chronic kidney disease.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

In collaboration with the University of California at San Francisco and the University of Michigan, CDC implemented a national surveillance system for chronic kidney disease (CKD). The national CKD Surveillance System, available through an interactive website, documents the burden of CKD and its risk factors in the US population over time and tracks the progress of our efforts to prevent, detect, and manage CKD. It also provides the means for evaluating, monitoring, and implementing quality improvement efforts by both federal and nonfederal agencies, and for monitoring kidney disease objectives for Healthy People 2020. CDC and its partners continue to identify sources of CKD data, identify gaps and deficiencies in the existing data sources, and propose creative solutions to fill the gaps and address the deficiencies.

CDC also is providing supplementary funding to the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey for the collection and analysis of laboratory specimens to measure creatinine and albumin. CDC’s National Center for Health Statistics directs the data collection contractor in establishing and revising protocols for the nephrology component of the survey and in preparing training and field manuals.

Contact Information
Nilka Ríos Burrows, MPH, MT (ASCP)
CKD Initiative Team Lead
CDC Division of Diabetes Translation
Phone: 770-488-1057
E-mail: nrios@cdc.gov
Website: http://www.cdc.gov/ckd

The Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology in the Military Health System (MHS) project is a collaboration between CDC and the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences in support of the CKD Initiative’s surveillance, epidemiology and health outcomes activities. The aim of this project is to 1) characterize the prevalence and incidence of CKD and kidney failure in MHS patients that includes assessing the important epidemiological associations among active-duty and non-active duty populations; and 2) assessing risk factors for the development of CKD in active-duty patients to determine how they differ from nonactive-duty patients and the general population.

Contact Information
Meda Pavkov, MD, PhD
Phone: 770-488-1160
E-mail: MPavkov@cdc.gov
Website: http://www.cdc.gov/ckd

For more information about CDC’s CKD Initiative, see Chronic Kidney Disease Initiative—Protecting Kidney Health pdf .

Last Updated: July 6, 2016

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This information was reviewed by KICC agency representatives. It may not reflect new or future agency activities. For more information, please contact the listed representatives.​​​​​