U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
NIDDK Director's Update

Education and Information Programs

Winter 2014

NDEP: National Diabetes Month focuses on heart health, managing the ABCs of diabetes

Image of the National Diabetes Month 2014 FacebookIn observance of National Diabetes Month in November, the National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP) – an initiative of the NIH and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention – urged people to Be Smart About Your Heart by managing the ABCs of Diabetes.

People with diabetes are nearly twice as likely to die from heart disease or stroke than a person without diabetes. The good news is that people with diabetes can lower their chances of having diabetes-related heart problems by managing their Diabetes ABCs:

  • A is for the A1C test (A-one-C), a blood test that measures average blood sugar (glucose) level over the past three months.
  • B is for blood pressure.
  • C is for cholesterol.
  • S is for stopping smoking.

More than 29 million Americans have diabetes, and an estimated one in four people with diabetes does not know they have it. If left undiagnosed or untreated, diabetes can lead to serious health problems, including heart attack and stroke.

Additionally, in October, NIDDK director Dr. Griffin P. Rodgers supported outreach efforts around this important topic by participating in a national radio media tour, reaching 1,200 radio stations and more than 1.5 million listeners across the United States. Listen to Rodgers here.

NDEP offers many resources to help people with diabetes take important steps to stay healthy and prevent diabetes-related heart problems.  For more information, visit https://ndep.nih.gov/resources/diabetes-healthsense.

NKDEP: New resource helps diabetes educators address kidney disease

Image of diabetes educator and patientDiabetes is the leading cause of chronic kidney disease (CKD), and diabetes educators have a crucial role in supporting early detection and slowing progression of CKD. Additionally, diabetes educators often have well-established relationships with patients when they are diagnosed with kidney disease. These existing relationships may enable educators to be a trusted source of information and support to people with diabetic kidney disease.

To prepare diabetes educators to care for people who develop kidney complications from diabetes, the National Kidney Disease Education Program (NKDEP) has developed a four-module training program. Each module focuses on a specific aspect of kidney disease management, including disease identification, slowing progression, addressing complications, and educating patients. In partnership with the American Association of Diabetes Educators, the training modules will be available for continuing education credits on the AADE website in the coming months.

NKDEP aims to improve the understanding, detection and management of kidney disease. For more information, visit nkdep.nih.gov.

WIN: Revised brochure encourages physical activity, no matter your size

Image of Active at Any Size publication coverThe Weight-control Information Network (WIN) has updated its resource, Active at Any Size, to help people of all sizes safely get and stay physically active.

The revised brochure outlines options such as walking, water workouts, strength training, and mind/body exercises. It offers safety tips, suggestions for comfortable workout clothing, questions to ask when choosing a fitness center, and more. Also included are sample activity journal and a blank journal page for readers to write down their weekly activity, short- and long-term goals, and planned rewards for their efforts. With colorful photos of people being active, the brochure invites everyone to jump in and get moving!

To view and download Active at Any Size, visit the WIN website at www.win.niddk.nih.gov or request printed copies by calling WIN at 877-946-4627.