U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
 

 Contact Info

 
Tel: 602-200-5200
Email: jeff.curtis@nih.gov
 

 Select Experience

 
  • Chief ResidentGood Samaritan Regional Medical Center1996-1997
  • ResidencyGood Samaritan Regional Medical Center1993-1996
  • M.P.H.University of Arizona1997
  • M.D.Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences1993
 

 Related Links

 
    Specialties
    • Clinical Research
    Research Summary/In Plain Language

    Research Summary

    Research Goal

    Our goal is to learn the causes of and most effective ways to prevent type 2 diabetes and its complications.

    Current Research

    I am involved in research that focuses on the prevention of diabetes and obesity in populations with high rates of these conditions.  My main studies examine lifestyle or pharmaceutical interventions for the prevention of diabetes or its complications.  Additional research will determine the impact of optimizing weight gain during pregnancy to determine the impact on maternal and offspring metabolism.  Through our work, we aim to determine the causes and complications of diabetes.  I work in the role of associate investigator on most studies.  As such, my primary responsibilities include overseeing the clinic staff who recruit participants, providing interventions, and collecting data.​

    Applying our Research

    Diabetes-related health problems have increased dramatically in recent decades. This research will help the public by decreasing the suffering and costs associated with diabetes and its complications.

    Need for Further Study

    Several areas in this field require further study. Scientists should determine the genetic and epigenetic causes of diabetes. This knowledge will help us better understand individual risk for the disease. It will also identify mechanisms that researchers may exploit to improve prevention and treatment. Scientists also need to identify the most effective preventive strategies for individuals and populations and optimal treatments for diabetes and its complications. Although scientists have advanced knowledge in these areas and increased the pace of research, we have much to learn.