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Family Health History Quiz

True or false? If my parent or sibling has type 2 diabetes, I am at an increased risk to develop type 2 diabetes.

True - A family history of type 2 diabetes is a strong risk factor for the disease. If you have a mother, father, brother, or sister with diabetes, you are at risk for type 2 diabetes. But even if you have a family history of type 2 diabetes, there are many things you can do to lower your risk. If you’re overweight, losing five to seven percent of your body weight (for example, 10 pounds if you weigh 200 pounds) by exercising 30 minutes a day, five days a week and making healthy food choices can help to prevent or delay type 2 diabetes.

Check out these resources for more information:

Small Steps publications coverSmall Steps. Big Rewards. Your GAME PLAN to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

This three-booklet package helps people assess their risk for developing diabetes and implement a program to prevent or delay the onset of the disease.

Get Real publication coverGet Real! You Don't Have to Knock Yourself Out to Prevent Diabetes

Tips to help people at risk for type 2 diabetes move more and eat less to lower their risk for diabetes

True or false? My mother has been told by her health care team that she is at high risk for diabetes, or that she has prediabetes, so she will get diabetes very soon.

False - Studies have shown that people at high risk for diabetes or with prediabetes can turn back the clock to delay or even prevent a diagnosis of diabetes by losing five to seven percent of your body weight if overweight (for example, 10 pounds if you weigh 200 pounds). You and your family can lose a modest amount of weight through simple lifestyle changes, such as increasing physical activity to about 30 minutes a day, five days a week and making healthy food choices. For some people with prediabetes, intervening early can actually return elevated blood glucose (also called blood sugar) levels to the normal range.

Check out these resources for more information:

It's Not Too Late publication coverIt’s Not Too Late to Prevent Diabetes

This tip sheet includes tips to help older adults at risk for type 2 diabetes move more and eat less to lower their risk for diabetes.

Choose More publication coverChoose More than 50 Ways to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

Tips to help African Americans at risk for type 2 diabetes move more and eat less to lower their risk for diabetes.

 

True or false? Type 2 diabetes runs in my family, so there is nothing I can do to prevent getting the disease.

False - Even though a family history of type 2 diabetes is a strong risk factor for developing the disease, some of this risk is a result of lifestyle. Being overweight, making unhealthy food choices, and not getting enough exercise can increase your risk for type 2 diabetes. If you are overweight, losing five to seven percent of your body weight (for example, 10 pounds if you weigh 200 pounds) by making healthy food choices and increasing physical activity to about 30 minutes a day, five days a week can help lower your risk for type 2 diabetes. Adopting healthy habits as an individual or as a family is good for everyone.

Check out these resources for more information:

Two Reasons publication coverTwo Reasons I Find Time to Prevent Diabetes: My Future and Theirs

This resource, available in 16 languages, includes tips to help Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders at risk for type 2 diabetes move more and eat less to help lower their risk for diabetes.

Tasty Recipes publication coverTasty Recipes for People with Diabetes and Their Families. Recipe Booklet​

A bilingual booklet, Tasty Recipes is filled with recipes specifically designed for Latin Americans. Recipes are accompanied by their nutritional facts table. The booklet also includes diabetes health information and resources. This effective, yet practical, educational promotional tool is a terrific addition to any kitchen.

 

True or false? My mother was diagnosed with diabetes when she was pregnant with me so she and I are both at an increased risk for developing diabetes.

True - When a woman gets diabetes during pregnancy, called gestational diabetes, she is at an increased risk for developing diabetes for the rest of her life. Additionally, her child is at an increased risk for becoming obese and for developing type 2 diabetes for the rest of his or her life. But there are many ways to lower this risk for both mother and child.

Check out these resources for more information:​​

Did You Know publication coverDid You Have Gestational Diabetes When You Were Pregnant? What You Need to Know.

This tip sheet can help women with a history of gestational diabetes prevent or delay type 2 diabetes and lower their children’s risk for developing the disease.disease.


 

Learn How to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes in Your Family

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP) is jointly sponsored by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) with the support of more than 200 partner organizations.

This information is not copyrighted. The NIDDK encourages people to share this content freely.


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