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Support Your Patients with Resources and Referrals

Once patients are ready to initiate lifestyle changes for type 2 diabetes prevention, they will likely need support to reach their goals. You may choose to provide this support directly or refer patients to resources or intervention programs designed to support lifestyle change.​

  • Small Steps. Big Reward. Your GAME PLAN to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes: This NDEP resource helps people assess their risk for developing diabetes and implement a program to prevent or delay the onset of the disease. It includes:
  • Diabetes HealthSense is the NDEP’s online library of resources that can help patients at risk for diabetes make and sustain lifestyle changes that can prevent or delay type 2 diabetes. Diabetes HealthSense also offers:
  • As part of the National Diabetes Prevention Program, CDC-recognized lifestyle change programs are offered in more than 500 varied locations such as local YMCAs, community centers, medical clinics, faith-based organizations, and worksites, and are also available online. Participants meet in groups or online with a trained lifestyle coach for 16 weekly sessions and 6–8 monthly follow-up sessions. Out-of-pocket costs for a full year of program participation are approximately $400–$500, with many program providers offering monthly payment plans and discounts based on ability to pay. A growing number of private insurers cover patient participation in diabetes prevention programs, and several employers include the program as part of workplace wellness programs. Find a recognized program. The Weight-control Information Network provides up-to-date, science-based information on weight control, obesity, physical activity, and related nutritional issues.
  • The National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse (NDIC) offers handouts about diabetes and its prevention, including a Diabetes Awareness and Prevention Series to raise awareness among people not yet diagnosed. NDIC is an information dissemination service for the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.
  • Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics offers nutrition information for the public. In addition, registered dietitians are uniquely skilled in developing nutrition plans for weight loss and diabetes prevention. Although counseling for prediabetes is not covered through Medicare, coverage varies with other insurers. Find a registered dietitian.
  • Healthways Silver Sneakers Fitness programis designed for encouraging physical activity in older adults. More than 65 Medicare health plans offer the program as a benefit to members. Find a program.
  • Local hospitals, health departments, libraries, senior centers, or faith-based organizations may offer additional programs or seminars about type 2 diabetes prevention. Find a local health department.
  • Group weight loss programs led by health care professionals or peer models and offered in person or online may be available to offer behavioral support.
  • The use of technology can be considered for self-monitoring, feedback, behavior change, coping strategies, and games or simulation experiences. More research is needed to determine the effectiveness of these technologies, but they are currently available and widely used.
  • Although not focused exclusively on the goal of diabetes prevention, other commercial weight loss programs, such as Weight Watchers, are widely available and may be of interest to many patients.
    • For any commercial program, patients should be informed of possible fees and that the weight loss goals and strategies advised by these programs may not have been studied as extensively for adults with prediabetes.
    • Although many of these strategies may also prove helpful, their potential benefit relative to a “DPP” approach may not yet be known. For this reason, patients should be advised to avoid programs that promise dramatic weight losses or advise drastic dietary restrictions that could be hard to maintain or even prove harmful.

The Patient-Centered Medical Home model emphasizes coordinated care integrated across settings, including in the patient’s community. Health care teams should become familiar with resources in their community so that they can make appropriate referrals. Community health workers can play an important role in this process. Learn more about developing community partnerships.​

References

1. Albright AL, Gregg EW. Preventing type 2 diabetes in communities across the U.S.: the National Diabetes Prevention Program. Am J Prev Med. 2013;44(4 Suppl 4):S346-51.​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​

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