U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

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Connect your members with evidence-based kidney disease resources and tools to help them care for their patients and clients.

Newsletter Articles

Tailor these articles about kidney health and free NKDEP resources and include them in your next newsletter.

Tools and Resources to Help Address Chronic Kidney Disease in Primary Care

The National Kidney Disease Education Program (NKDEP), a part of the National Institutes of Health, works to improve the identification of people with chronic kidney disease and promotes the implementation of evidence-based interventions, with the goal of reducing disparities and improving care.

Include this article about NKDEP and the many resources and materials it offers in your next newsletter to health care professionals.

Social Media

Promote kidney health on your organizations’ Facebook and Twitter feeds with these easy to use posts. Just click Share or Tweet, or copy and paste.

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NKDEP works to reduce the burden of chronic kidney disease, especially among communities at risk. Watch videos, find free resources, and learn how you can do your part by visiting: nkdep.nih.gov​.

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Twitter

#CKD is a growing public health problem in the US. [Name] supports @NarvaNKDEP & @NIH efforts to reduce its burden: nkdep.nih.gov.

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NKDEP works to help people manage their #kidney health. Learn about the diagnosis & management of #kidneydisease: nkdep.nih.gov.

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Images

Use these images in patient education materials to easily explain kidney disease, testing, and treatment. View larger image and right click to save. For more images, visit the NIDDK image library.

​​​​​​Some of the images that were created by NKDEP can also be downloaded and used in other materials at no charge. These images are located below with accompanying captions that you are welcome to use in your materials, newsletters, and other communications.

We do ask that you credit each illustration downloaded as follows: National Kidney Disease Education Program, National Institutes of Health.

A speedometer-like dial shows GFR results of 0 to 15 in red as kidney failure, 15 to 60 in yellow as kidney disease, and 60 to 120 in green as normal.

Graphic of a speedometer-like dial that depicts GFR results (JPG, 12 KB)

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A rectangle represents the GFR ranges for kidney failure, CKD, and normal kidney function. A red strip below 15 at the bottom of the rectangle represents kidney failure. A yellow strip between 15 and 59 in the middle of the rectangle represents CKD. A green strip above 60 at the top of the rectangle represents normal kidney function. Text in the green section notes that CKD may be present with a GFR at or above 60 if the UACR is greater than 30. Text to the left of the rectangle notes that NKDEP recommends reporting GFR values greater than or equal to 60 as > or = 60, rather than numeric values because values above 60 are not reliable.
Interpreting eGFR results chart (JPG, 19 KB)

 

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An illustration of the urinary system that is made up of the kidneys and the urine collecting system.

The urinary system is made up of the kidneys and the urine collecting system (JPG, 45 KB)

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A schematic of an arteriovenous or AV fistula.

Schematic of an arteriovenous or AV fistula (JPG, 26 KB)

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A schematic of the hemodialysis process 

Schematic of the hemodialysis process (JPG, 32 KB)

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A schematic showing a transplanted kidney placed in the groin area. Three kidneys are shown to illustrate that the native kidneys are usually not removed.

Schematic showing a transplanted kidney placed in the groin area. Native kidneys usually are not removed 
(JPG, 85 KB)

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A schematic of a continuous cycler-assisted peritoneal dialysis exchange while person is sleeping.

Schematic of a continuous cycler-assisted peritoneal dialysis exchange while person is sleeping (JPG, 48 KB)

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A schematic of a person receiving continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis exchange while reading.

Schematic of a person receiving continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis exchange while reading 
(JPG, 39 KB)

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A schematic showing that the peritoneal membrane is the semipermeable

Schematic showing that
the peritoneal membrane is the semipermeable “filter” in 
peritoneal dialysis​ (JPG, 38 KB)

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A schematic showing part of  a cycle of peritoneal dialysis or exchange. 

Schematic showing during a cycle of peritoneal dialysis or exchange ​
(JPG, 61 KB)

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A schematic showing  catheter placement for temporary access.

Schematic showing catheter placement for temporary access (JPG, 31 KB)

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