Alzheimer's Disease: What You Need to Know


Dr. Hodes, director of the National Institute on Aging, joins Dr. Rodgers to talk about Alzheimer’s disease.

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Transcript

DR. RODGERS: Many older people forget a name or misplace things from time to time. This kind of forgetfulness is normal. But memory loss that affects your daily life may be a symptom of Alzheimer's disease.

Hi, I’m Dr. Griffin Rodgers, director of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases at NIH.

My colleague, Dr. Richard Hodes, director of the National Institute on Aging at NIH, explains:

DR. HODES: Alzheimer’s disease is an illness of the brain. Nerve cells in the brain lose function and are unable to connect, or they die. Over time, a person loses the ability to remember things and to think clearly.

Alzheimer’s begins slowly and gets worse over time. People become forgetful and easily confused and may have a hard time concentrating. Gradually, they need help doing basic things like bathing, getting dressed, and eating.

If you have concerns about memory loss, talk to your doctor.

DR. RODGERS: For more information, follow us on Twitter @NIDDKgov. This is Dr. Griffin Rodgers with the NIH.

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