U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

News Archive

News Type

Date Range


NIDDK News Item

Nov 13, 2017

Obesity during pregnancy — independent of its health consequences such as diabetes — may account for the higher risk of giving birth to an atypically large infant, according to researchers at the National Institutes of Health. Their study appears in JAMA Pediatrics.

NIDDK News Item

Nov 6, 2017

For the first time, scientists have found a connection between abnormalities in how the brain breaks down glucose and the severity of the signature amyloid plaques and tangles in the brain, as well as the onset of eventual outward symptoms, of Alzheimer’s disease.

NIDDK News Item

Nov 1, 2017

More than 30 million people in the United States have diabetes – and each one is the most important member of their diabetes care team. This National Diabetes Month, I urge everyone with diabetes to make your care a joint effort between you, your loved ones and your health care team.

NIDDK News Item

Oct 2, 2017

The 2017 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine has been awarded to National Institutes of Health grantees Jeffrey C. Hall, Ph.D., of the University of Maine, Orono; Michael Rosbash, Ph.D., of Brandeis University, Waltham, Massachusetts; and Michael W. Young, Ph.D., of Rockefeller University, New York City, for their discoveries of molecular mechanisms controlling the circadian rhythm.

NIDDK News Item

Sep 13, 2017

Can a high-tech water bottle help reduce the recurrence of kidney stones? What about a financial incentive? Those are questions researchers funded by the National Institutes of Health will seek to answer as they begin recruiting participants for a two-year clinical trial at four sites across the country. Scientists will test whether using a smart water bottle that encourages people to drink more water, and therefore urinate, will reduce the recurrence of urinary stone disease, commonly referred to as kidney stones. The trial is supported by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), part of NIH.

NIDDK News Item

Sep 12, 2017

More than 60 percent of investigational drugs fail in human clinical trials due to a lack of effectiveness, despite promising pre-clinical studies using cell and animal research models. To help combat this translational science problem, the National Institutes of Health announced 13 two-year awards totaling about $15 million per year, with FY18 funds subject to availability, to develop 3-D microphysiological system platforms that model human disease. The funding is for the first phase of a five-year program. These platforms, called “tissue chips,” support living cells and human tissues to mimic the complex biological functions of human organs and systems and provide a new way to test potential drug efficacy.

NIDDK News Item

Jul 26, 2017

On August 10, Discovery will premiere First in Human, a three-part documentary on the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, providing an unprecedented, first-hand look at the successes and setbacks that are a part of developing brand-new medicines that may ultimately benefit millions worldwide. Over a period of a year, film crews embedded within the hospital follow four patients who volunteered to participate in experimental treatments in the hopes they will help them, or others in the future. The series also follows the dedicated doctors and nurses who carry out the research while caring for the patients. Narrated by Jim Parsons (“The Big Bang Theory,” “Hidden Figures,”), First in Human will air August 10, 17 and 24 at 9 p.m. ET/PT.

NIDDK News Item

Jul 18, 2017

More than 100 million U.S. adults are now living with diabetes or prediabetes, according to a new report released today by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The report finds that as of 2015, 30.3 million Americans – 9.4 percent of the U.S. population –have diabetes. Another 84.1 million have prediabetes, a condition that if not treated often leads to type 2 diabetes within five years.

NIDDK News Item

Jul 10, 2017

Using a larger dataset than for any previous human movement study, National Institutes of Health-funded researchers at Stanford University in Palo Alto, California, have tracked physical activity by population for more than 100 countries. Their research follows on a recent estimate that more than 5 million people die each year from causes associated with inactivity.

NIDDK News Item

Jun 29, 2017

Investigators at the National Institutes of Health and international colleagues have discovered a genetic cause and potential treatment strategy for a rare immune disorder called CHAPLE disease. Children with the condition can experience severe gastrointestinal distress and deep vein blood clots. No effective treatments are available to ameliorate or prevent these life-threatening symptoms.

NIDDK News Item

Jun 28, 2017

New findings from mouse models reveal that the type of immune response that helps maintain healthy metabolism in fatty tissues, called type 2 immunity, also drives obesity-induced nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). The work, led by scientists at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health, shows that the inflammatory environment in the fatty liver is more complex than previously thought.

NIDDK Newsletter

NIDDK's Health Information News, an e-newsletter that provides subscribers with information from all of the NIDDK's health communications programs, including the National Diabetes Education Program; the National Kidney Disease Education Program; the Weight-control Information Network; health topics for diabetes, digestive diseases, and kidney and urologic diseases; and blood diseases and endocrine and metabolic diseases.

NIDDK News Item

Jun 7, 2017

Children born to women with gestational diabetes whose diet included high proportions of refined grains may have a higher risk of obesity by age 7, compared to children born to women with gestational diabetes who ate low proportions of refined grains, according to results from a National Institutes of Health study. These findings, which appear online in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, were part of the Diabetes & Women’s Health Study, a research project led by NIH’s Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD).

NIDDK News Item

Jun 6, 2017

Children born to women who had gestational diabetes and drank at least one artificially sweetened beverage per day during pregnancy were more likely to be overweight or obese at age 7, compared to children born to women who had gestational diabetes and drank water instead of artificially sweetened beverages, according to a study led by researchers at the National Institutes of Health. Childhood obesity is known to increase the risk for certain health problems later in life, such as diabetes, heart disease, stroke and some cancers. The study appears online in the International Journal of Epidemiology.

NIDDK News Item

Jun 1, 2017

A small study by researchers at the National Institutes of Health suggests that mutations in the gene CABLES1 may lead to Cushing syndrome, a rare disorder in which the body overproduces the stress hormone cortisol. The study appears online in Endocrine-Related Cancer.

NIDDK News Item

May 18, 2017

A study in mice and humans suggests that bacteria in the gut can influence the structure of the brain’s blood vessels, and may be responsible for producing malformations that can lead to stroke or epilepsy. The research, published in Nature, adds to an emerging picture that connects intestinal microbes and disorders of the nervous system. The study was funded by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), a part of the National Institutes of Health.

NIDDK Grantee News

May 17, 2017

[Northwestern University; University of Pittsburgh] Researchers conducted one of the largest, prospective, multicenter studies of psychological outcomes in living liver donors, examining mental well-being, psychological growth, motivations and emotions about their donations. Careful screening may optimize outcomes for potentially vulnerable donors.

NIDDK Grantee News

May 3, 2017

[Texas A&M University Health Science Center] Researchers worked with rat models to demonstrate that renal immune cell infiltration and inflammation cause lymphangiogenesis in hypertension- and aging-associated renal injury.

NIDDK News Item

Apr 19, 2017

Adjusting the frequency of eye screenings for people with type 1 diabetes based on their risk of severe eye problems would result in fewer eye exams at lower cost and quicker diagnosis and treatment of advanced retinopathy, which can otherwise lead to vision loss. The findings, published April 19 in the New England Journal of Medicine(link is external), are the latest from an ongoing study funded for more than 30 years by the National Institutes of Health.

NIDDK News Item

Apr 13, 2017

Rates of new diagnosed cases of type 1 and type 2 diabetes are increasing among youth in the United States, according to a report, Incidence Trends of Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes among Youths, 2002-2012.

NIDDK News Item

Mar 13, 2017

An international team of researchers has conducted the first study of its kind to look at the genomic underpinnings of obesity in continental Africans and African-Americans.

NIDDK Grantee News

Mar 9, 2017

[Harvard Medical School; University of Osnabrück] Cytokines are classically thought to stimulate downstream signaling pathways through monotonic activation of receptors. We describe a severe anemia resulting from a homozygous mutation (R150Q) in the cytokine erythropoietin (EPO). Study results demonstrate how variation in a single cytokine can lead to biased downstream signaling and can thereby cause human disease. Moreover, researchers have defined a distinct treatable form of anemia through mutation identification and functional studies.

NIDDK News Item

Mar 9, 2017

This World Kidney Day, improve your kidney health by making a commitment to reach or maintain a healthy weight. Extra weight increases the risk of developing diabetes and high blood pressure, the two most common causes of chronic kidney disease (CKD). People affected by obesity have an 83 percent higher risk of developing CKD compared to those who have a healthy weight.

NIDDK News Item

Mar 1, 2017

There appears to be no benefit to treating mildly low thyroid function during pregnancy, according to a study by a National Institutes of Health research network.

NIDDK Grantee News

Feb 28, 2017

[Colorado School of Public Health; Wake Forest School of Medicine] The increased prevalence of type 2 diabetes among children and adolescents has been relatively recent in most populations, beginning in the early- to mid-1990s. Additionally, a long-term increase in type 1 diabetes has been observed both worldwide and in the United States. These recent epidemiologic trends in type 1 and type 2 diabetes diagnosed in young individuals raise the question of whether the pattern of complications differs by diabetes type at similar ages and diabetes duration. Recent studies have reported a higher prevalence of some but not all complications in children and adolescents with type 2 diabetes compared with those with type 1.

NIDDK News Item

Feb 28, 2017

Teens and young adults with type 2 diabetes develop kidney, nerve, and eye diseases – as well as some risk factors for heart disease – more often than their peers with type 1 diabetes in the years shortly after diagnosis. The results are the latest findings of the SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth study, published Feb. 28 in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

NIDDK Grantee News

Feb 23, 2017

[Joslin Diabetes Center and Harvard Medical School; University of Campinas] Adipose tissue is a major site of energy storage and has a role in the regulation of metabolism through the release of adipokines. Transplantation of both white and brown adipose tissue—brown especially—into mice restores the level of numerous circulating miRNAs that are associated with an improvement in glucose tolerance and a reduction in hepatic Fgf21 mRNA and circulating FGF21.

NIDDK News Item

Feb 9, 2017

Analyzing a hair sample may help with the diagnosis of Cushing Syndrome, a rare and potentially fatal disorder in which the body overproduces the stress hormone cortisol, according to researchers at the National Institutes of Health.

NIDDK News Item

Feb 7, 2017

The first of several major research efforts to test and refine artificial pancreas systems is now underway. Four separate projects, funded by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), are designed to be the potential last steps between testing the fully automated devices and requesting regulatory approval for permanent use. A successful artificial pancreas would be a life-changing advance for many people with type 1 diabetes. NIDDK is part of the National Institutes of Health.

NIDDK News Item

Feb 3, 2017

Couples in which both partners are obese may take from 55 to 59 percent longer to achieve pregnancy, compared to their normal weight counterparts, according to a study by researchers at the National Institutes of Health.

NIDDK Grantee News

Feb 1, 2017

[University of California at San Diego School of Medicine] The aim of this study is to determine the mechanism by which antimuscarinic compounds enhance neurite outgrowth and to translate findings into a therapeutic approach that could prevent or reverse peripheral neuropathy in a range of in vitro and in vivo models. Our data introduce selective or specific antimuscarinic drugs as a therapeutic approach for preventing and reversing sensory neuropathy in a variety of disease states of the PNS.

NIDDK Grantee News

Jan 26, 2017

[University of California, San Francisco; Massachusetts Institute of Technology] Researchers show that an approach combining bioinformatics, synthetic biology, and heterologous gene cluster expression can rapidly expand our knowledge of the metabolic potential of the microbiota while avoiding the challenges of cultivating fastidious commensals.

NIDDK Grantee News

Jan 19, 2017

[Scripps Research Institute; Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne] Advances have accelerated the discovery of chemical probes for studying biological processes. Researchers here describe a platform that marries fragment-based ligand discovery with quantitative chemical proteomics to map thousands of reversible small molecule-protein interactions directly in human cells. Researchers further explored fragment-based ligands that promote adipogenesis.

NIDDK Grantee News

Jan 11, 2017

[Washington University School of Medicine] Researchers identified dietary practice (DP)-associated gut bacterial taxa in individuals practicing calorie restriction. When transplanted into mice, the bacterial taxa were linked to enhanced responses to a diet intervention and changes in several metabolic features.

NIDDK News Item

Jan 5, 2017

An expert panel sponsored by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health, issued clinical guidelines today to aid health care providers in early introduction of peanut-containing foods to infants to prevent the development of peanut allergy.

NIDDK Grantee News

Jan 3, 2017

[Columbia University; University of Florida College of Medicine Gainesville] Humans and mice deficient in PC1 display hyperphagic obesity, hypogonadism, decreased GH, and hypoinsulinemic diabetes due to impaired prohormone processing. Using mice, our findings suggest that the major neuroendocrine features of PWS are due to PC1 deficiency.

NIDDK Grantee News

Dec 21, 2016

[University of Iowa] Researchers used a transgenic autoimmune cystitis mouse model (URO-OVA) to study pelvic pain. Results provide direct evidence for the role of mast cells in cystitis-associated LUTD (lower urinary tract dysfunction), supporting the use of mast cell inhibitors for treatment of certain forms of interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome.

NIDDK Grantee News

Dec 20, 2016

[Duke University; University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill] Programmed death and shedding of epithelial cells is a powerful defense mechanism to reduce bacterial burden during infection but this activity cannot be indiscriminate because of the critical barrier function of the epithelium. We report that during cystitis, mast cells trigger bladder epithelial cell (BEC) exfoliation during E. coli infection.

NIDDK Grantee News

Dec 19, 2016

[Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute; Mayo Clinic College of Medicine] In this large genome-wide association study of primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) researchers identified four new genome-wide significant loci.

NIDDK News Item

Dec 13, 2016

The National Institutes of Health Common Fund announced today the first awards for the Molecular Transducers of Physical Activity in Humans Program, which will allow researchers to develop a comprehensive map of the molecular changes that occur in response to physical activity.

NIDDK Grantee News

Dec 5, 2016

[Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School; Boston University School of Public Health] The goal of this study was to gain new insights into the underlying genetics of body fat distribution by conducting sample-size-weighted fixed-effects genome-wide association meta-analyses in up to 9,594 women and 8,738 men of European, African, Hispanic and Chinese ancestry, with and without sex stratification, for six traits associated with ectopic fat.

NIDDK Grantee News

Nov 23, 2016

[Washington University School of Medicine] Researchers introduced collections of sequenced gut bacterial strains cultured from healthy or underweight Bangladeshi children into germfree mice-fed diets resembling those consumed by the children. Young mouse recipients of undernourished donors’ microbiota exhibit growth faltering, manifested in part by a reduced rate of lean body mass gain compared to recipients of healthy donors’ microbiota. These differences are not associated with differences in food consumption. Adult mouse recipients of undernourished donor’s microbiota exhibit a weight loss (wasting) phenotype.

NIDDK Grantee News

Nov 22, 2016

[University of Michigan Medical School] Study authors have pioneered a strategy using small iron-chelating compounds called siderophores as vaccine antigens. This report highlights the untapped resource of bacteria-specific small molecules as potential vaccine antigens and provides a proof of principle for incorporating these compounds into multicomponent vaccines for the prevention of bacterial infections.