U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
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Impacts of Sleep and Circadian Disruption on Energy Balance and Diabetes

2/19/2015 8:00 AM
2/20/2015 1:00 PM
Yes
No

For questions concerning program content, contact:

Karen Teff, Ph.D.
DEMD/NIDDK/NIH
Two Democracy Plaza, Room 685
6707 Democracy Boulevard, MSC 5464
Bethesda, MD 20892 (by Fedex 20817)
Phone: (301) 594-8803
Email: karen.teff@nih.gov

Corinne M. Silva, Ph.D.
DEMD/NIDDK/NIH
Two Democracy Plaza, Room 794
6707 Democracy Boulevard, MSC 5464
Bethesda, MD 20892 (by Fedex 20817)
Phone: (301) 451-7335
Email: silvacm@mail.nih.gov

For questions concerning meeting logistics, contact:

John Hare, M.S., CMP, CGMP
The Scientific Consulting Group, Inc.
656 Quince Orchard Road, Suite 210
Gaithersburg, MD  20878
Phone:  (301) 670-4990
Fax:  (301) 670-3815
Email:  jhare@scgcorp.com

Bethesda
 
John Edward Porter Neuroscience Research Center (PNRC II)

Event Details

​Mechanistic and molecular studies in animal models demonstrate that disruptions in circadian rhythms and/or the molecular components of central and peripheral clock proteins profoundly influence glucose and lipid metabolism as well as body adiposity. Epidemiological evidence in humans also suggests that sleep disruption is associated with increased body weight and impaired glucose tolerance. However, a number of scientific gaps remain. Currently, the individual mechanisms that mediate the differential effects on metabolism of the circadian clock, the sleep-wake cycle, and the timing of feeding have not been identified. Furthermore, the translation of these findings has only been applied to humans in limited approaches. To determine if and how modulation of sleep/circadian rhythms and timing of feeding can be used to attenuate and perhaps treat the growing epidemic of obesity and type 2 diabetes, it is essential to move the field forward and identify the mechanisms that link sleep and metabolism. In addition, it is important to determine which clinical populations would be most responsive to sleep modulation, and if chronotherapy could be applied to the treatment of obesity and diabetes.  The goals of this workshop are to: 1) bring together experts in the field of circadian regulation, sleep, and glucose/lipid metabolism; 2) review the current state of knowledge in human and nonhuman models; and, with this background, 3) determine the appropriate methodologies and studies that need to be conducted to establish whether modulating sleep and circadian rhythms can effectively contribute to the treatment of obesity and diabetes.​​​

Agenda

Thursday, February 19, 2015

7:30 a.m.

Registration

Session I: Sleep Disruption and Sleep Disorders: Effects on Metabolic Disease


8:00 a.m.

Welcome
Karen Teff and Corinne Silva, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK)

8:05 a.m.

Sleep Disturbances, Circadian Dysfunction, and Diabetes Risk
Eve Van Cauter, University of Chicago

8:45 a.m.

Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Diabetes: Clinical Studies and Mechanisms
Allan Pack, University of Pennsylvania

Session II: Neural Regulation of Energy Balance, Sleep, and Circadian Rhythms


9:25 a.m.

Using Mouse Genetics to Unravel the CNS Pathways Regulating Energy Balance and Glucose Homeostasis
Joel Elmquist, The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center

9:50 a.m.

Regulation of Circadian Rhythms in Nocturnal and Diurnal Mammals
Etienne Challet, University of Strasburg

10:15 a.m.

Sleep Restriction, Circadian Misalignment, and Metabolic Disorders: Clock Gene Dysregulation as a Final Common Pathway?
Paul Franken, University of Lausanne

10:40 a.m.

Welcome and Opening Remarks
Griffin P. Rodgers, Director, NIDDK

10:45 a.m.

Break

Session III: Mechanisms of Sleep and Circadian Disruptions on Metabolism


11:00 a.m.

Circadian Genomics of Diabetes and Human Islet Cell Biology 
Joseph Bass, Northwestern University

11:25 a.m.

Time-Restricted Feeding Is a Preventative and Therapeutic Intervention Against Metabolic Diseases
Satchin Panda, Salk Institute

11:50 a.m.

From Metabolism to Epigenetics: The Circadian Link
Paolo Sassone-Corsi, University of California, Irvine

12:15 p.m.

Lunch

Session IV: Approaches to Understanding the Mechanisms Contributing to Glucose Homeostasis


1:15 p.m.

Metabolically Normal and Abnormal Obesity
Sam Klein, Washington University in St. Louis School of Medicine

1:40 p.m.

Adipose Tissue Inflammation:  Role in Insulin Resistance
Philip Kern, University of Kentucky

2:05 p.m.

Hypoglycemia, Counter-regulation, and Sleep
Elizabeth Seaquist, University of Minnesota

2:30 p.m.

Do the Carotid Bodies Link Sleep Disorders, Diabetes, and the ANS?
Michael Joyner, Mayo Clinic

2:55 p.m.

Break

3:15 p.m.

Genetics of Type 2 Diabetes
Richa Saxena, Harvard Medical School

3:40p.m.

Discussion

  • What mechanisms mediating the effects of sleep disruption/circadian misalignment on metabolism have recently been identified?
  • How do these mechanisms overlap/integrate with pathways known to contribute to glucose dysregulation in humans?
  • How could methodologies used in measuring glucose metabolism be incorporated into sleep disruption/circadian misalignment studies?

5:00 p.m.

Adjournment

Friday, February 20, 2015

Session V: Current/Ongoing Studies on Sleep and Circadian Disruptions in Humans


8:00 a.m.

Separate Effects of Endogenous Circadian System, Behavioral Cycle, and Circadian Misalignment on Metabolism in Humans
Frank Scheer, Brigham and Women's Hospital/Harvard Medical School

8:25 a.m.

Impact of Insufficient Sleep and Circadian Misalignment on Metabolism in Humans
Kenneth Wright, University of Colorado

8:50 a.m.

Teasing Apart the Impact of Prior Exposure to Recurrent Circadian Disruption and Chronic Sleep Restriction on Pancreatic β-Cell Responsiveness
Charles Czeisler, Brigham and Women's Hospital/Harvard Medical School

9:15 a.m.

Break

10:00 a.m.

Genetic Traits of the Human Clock and Sleep Homeostat Can Inform Other Phenotypes
Louis Ptacek, University of California, San Francisco

10:25 a.m.

The State of the Art on the Bidirectional Association Between OSA and Metabolic Dysfunction
Naresh Punjabi, The Johns Hopkins University

10:50 a.m.

Discussion:

  • What are the optimal interventions of sleep and circadian rhythms that will address their mechanistic role in human metabolism?
  • What outcome measures of metabolism should be used to elucidate the mechanisms by which sleep and/or circadian dysregulation influence metabolism in humans?
  • What population of those with disrupted glucose/lipid metabolism or phenotypic population should be targeted so as to have the best chance of optimal outcome?

1:00 p.m.

Adjournment

Directions/Travel

John Edward Porter Neuroscience Research Center (PNRC II), Building 35A, Room 620/630

National Institutes of Health

Bethesda, MD

February 19 – 20, 2015

Air Travel

Travel arrangements are your own responsibility, but you should know that three airports (listed below) serve the Washington, DC, metropolitan area. Please make your own air or rail reservations.

If you decide to extend your stay to take advantage of lower fares, DC-area attractions are only a short distance away from the host hotel.

Hotel and travel information are listed below.

 

 

Accommodations

A block of sleeping rooms has been reserved at the following hotel:

Bethesda Marriott Hotel

5151 Pooks Hill Road

Bethesda, MD  20814

Phone:  (301) 897-9400 or (800) 228-9290

Fax:  (301) 897-0192

Website:  http://www.bethesdamarriott.com

(More hotel information can be obtained from this website.)

A limited number of sleeping rooms for conference participants has been reserved at the Bethesda Marriott Hotel. The rate is the prevailing government rate of $177 per night for single occupancy, plus tax (13%). To reserve a hotel room at the group rate, call reservations at (800) 266-9432 and identify yourself as a member of the Sleep Disruption Meeting, or book online at https://resweb.passkey.com/Resweb.do?mode=welcome_ei_new&eventID=12281919. THE ROOM BLOCK WILL BE IN EFFECT AT THE GOVERNMENT RATE ONLY UNTIL WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 28, 2015, OR UNTIL FULL, WHICHEVER COMES FIRST. ANY ROOM RESERVATIONS RECEIVED AFTER THIS DATE WILL BE ACCEPTED ON A SPACE- AND RATE-AVAILABILITY BASIS. Reservations should be made for arrival on February 18, 2015, with departure on February 20, 2015. If you require alternate dates, please send an email to John Hare of The Scientific Consulting Group, Inc. (SCG) at jhare@scgcorp.com. Any alternate date requests will need to be approved through the NIDDK.

Please be certain that the hotel provides you with a confirmation number for your reservation. After January 28, 2015, the official room block will be released, and the hotel may charge significantly higher rates and may be sold out. When making a reservation, please provide your room and bedding preferences. The hotel will assign specific room types at check-in, based on availability. Please be advised that requests are not guaranteed. Check-in time is 4:00 p.m., and checkout time is 12:00 p.m. If you need to cancel your reservation, please do so by 4:00 p.m. on the day prior to arrival, or you will be charged a
no-show fee for 1 night on your credit card.

For those staying at the hotel, we will have a shuttle departing from the hotel lobby to the meeting. Be sure to have a government issued photo ID available when you arrive at the lobby as NIH security procedures will be performed prior to boarding the shuttle. As there will be no shuttle service back to the hotel the final day of the meeting, please be sure to perform check-out procedures accordingly.

 

Taxi Service to Hotel

From Baltimore/Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport (BWI):

Approximate hotel distance and direction: 35 miles southwest

Estimated Taxi Fare: $70–$80

From Washington Dulles International Airport (IAD):

Approximate hotel distance and direction: 25 miles northeast

Estimated Taxi Fare: $55–$65

From Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport (DCA):

Approximate hotel distance and direction: 21 miles northeast

Estimated Taxi Fare: $45–$55

All three airports have taxis available and waiting.

Metro to the Hotel/NIH

The Metro system is clean and reliable. It operates from 5:00 a.m. to 12:00 midnight on Mondays through Thursdays; 5:00 a.m. to 3:00 a.m. on Fridays; 7:00 a.m. to 3:00 a.m. on Saturdays; and 7:00 a.m. to
12:00 midnight on Sundays. Each passenger must purchase a farecard to travel in the system. Instructions for purchasing farecards are posted on the vending machines in each station. Each Metro car features a complete, color-coded map of the system. Station attendants on duty at each station can provide additional information on request. From Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport, a cost-effective way to travel to the meeting is by using the Metrorail system. A map of the system is available at: http://www.wmata.com/rail/maps/map.cfm.

From the Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport station, take the Yellow Line toward Mt. Vernon Square or Fort Totten. At the Gallery Place/Chinatown stop, transfer to the Red Line toward Shady Grove or Grosvenor-Strathmore. For arrival at the hotel or NIH campus, exit at the Medical Center Station at the NIH. A shuttle may be arranged directly with the hotel or cabs are available.

The NIH visitor entrance is directly adjacent to the Medical Center Station. Once through security, it is a 10-15 minute walk to Building 35A, or you may take the campus shuttle.

SuperShuttle

SuperShuttle offers service to most hotels from Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport, Washington Dulles International Airport, and Baltimore/Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport. The shuttle leaves on an as-needed basis between the hours of 5:30 a.m. and 11:00 p.m. During other times, arrangements for a shuttle can be made by calling (800) 258-3826 from the airport, or visit their website at http://supershuttle.com.

 

NIH Visitor Information

Building 35A is located on Convent Drive on the NIH Campus. For a map, general information, and directions to and around the NIH Campus, visit http://www.ors.od.nih.gov/maps/Pages/NIH-Visitor-Map.aspx.

 

 

NIH Security

The NIH, like all Federal Government facilities, has instituted security measures to ensure the safety of NIH employees, patients, and visitors. The national threat advisory level, determined by the Department of Homeland Security (http://www.whitehouse.gov/homeland/), currently is yellow (elevated).

Perimeter Security

All visitor vehicles, including taxicabs, hotel and airport shuttles, delivery trucks, and vans, will be inspected before being allowed on campus. Visitors will be asked to show one (1) form of identification (a government-issued photo ID: driver’s license, passport, green card, etc.) and to state the purpose of their visit. Be sure to allow at least 15–20 minutes for this vehicle inspection procedure.

Building Security

Due to the checking of IDs at the perimeter, employees and visitors will not be required to show their ID again to gain access to the majority of buildings on the NIH Campus during the normal business day.

Employees and visitors should continue to wear their identification prominently at all times while on campus.

Guards will remain at certain buildings to address specific program requirements, such as sensitive research and safety concerns. At building entrances where guards are posted:

·         Employees must show a U.S. Department of Health and Human Services-issued photo ID (for example, your NIH-issued ID badge).

·         Visitors may be required to log in, wear a visitor’s pass, and be escorted by an employee through the building.

·         Visitors may be required to pass through a metal detector and have bags, backpacks, or purses inspected or X-rayed as they enter buildings.

·         Security staff will confiscate any suspicious or potentially dangerous materials. U.S. code prohibits bringing any dangerous weapons onto federal property, including anything with a blade longer than

2½ inches. Meeting participants may want to leave extra bags or personal materials at their hotel to minimize the time needed for inspection.

Weekday Pedestrian Campus Access

All visitors must enter through the NIH Gateway Center at the Metro or the West Gateway Center (see the Visitor Map at http://www.ors.od.nih.gov/maps/Pages/NIH-Visitor-Map.aspx).  

·         Gateway Center

Wisconsin Avenue at Gateway Drive (near the Metro)

Open 24 hours, 7 days per week

·         West Gateway Center

Near Old Georgetown Road and South Drive

Open 6:00 a.m.–12:00 p.m., Monday–Friday

 

 

Driving Directions to NIH

From Points North and East:

Take I-95 South to I-495 West (Capital Beltway) toward Silver Spring. Follow I-495 West for 9 miles to Exit 34 (Bethesda/Wisconsin Avenue). Follow signs for Route 355 South, and stay in the right lane. Travel approximately 1 mile, and turn right on NIH Gateway Drive, just past the light at South Drive. Pass through NIH security, and follow the signs to Building 35A.

From Points North and West:

Take I-270 South to I-495 East (Capital Beltway) toward Washington, DC. Stay in one of the three left lanes. Follow signs for Route 355 South, a left-lane exit, onto Wisconsin Avenue. Travel approximately
1 mile, and turn right on NIH Gateway Drive, just past the light at South Drive. Pass through NIH security, and follow the signs to Building 35A.

From Points South:

Take I-95 North to I-495 (Capital Beltway) toward Tyson’s Corner/Rockville. Follow I-495 for 20 miles. Take Exit 34 (Bethesda/Wisconsin Avenue). Travel approximately 1 mile, and turn right on NIH Gateway Drive, just past the light at South Drive. Pass through NIH security, and follow the signs to Building 35A.

From Baltimore/Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport (BWI):

Take the Route 195 connector to I-95 South. Take I-95 South to I-495 West (Capital Beltway) toward Silver Spring. Follow I-495 West for 9 miles to Exit 34 (Bethesda/Wisconsin Avenue). Follow signs for Route 355 South, and stay in the right lane. Travel approximately 1 mile, and turn right on NIH Gateway Drive, just past the light at South Drive. Pass through NIH security, and follow the signs to Building 35A.

From Washington Dulles International Airport (IAD):

Take the Dulles Access Road for approximately 13 miles to Exit 18. Move to the right on the Dulles Toll Road (Route 267) and take Exit 18. Stay left on the ramp for Bethesda/Baltimore, and proceed toward Bethesda (I-495). Continue approximately 9 miles on I-495. Stay on I-495 at the I-495/I-270 split (bear right). Take Exit 34 (Wisconsin Avenue South/Route 355) toward Bethesda. Travel approximately
1 mile, and turn right on NIH Gateway Drive, just past the light at South Drive. Pass through NIH security, and follow the signs to Building 35A.

From Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport (DCA):

Take the George Washington Parkway North for 12 miles to I-495 (Capital Beltway) toward Maryland. Take Exit 34 (Bethesda/Wisconsin Avenue). Travel approximately 1 mile, and turn right on NIH Gateway Drive, just past the light at South Drive. Pass through NIH security, and follow the signs to Building 35A.

 

 

Parking

Parking on the NIH campus is limited and is $12 per day in the visitor lots. A large parking garage is located at Gateway Center, just outside security. It is a 10-15-minute walk from there to Building 35A. The NIH campus shuttle may also be taken.

Minutes

Meeti​ng minutes are not available at th​is time.

Attendees

Meeti​ng attendees are not available at this time.

Abstracts

Meeting abstract information is not available at this time.

Location

Line
  • Building 35A, Room 620/630
  • National Institutes of Health
  • MD
Webinar

Contacts

Line

For questions concerning program content, contact:

Karen Teff, Ph.D.
DEMD/NIDDK/NIH
Two Democracy Plaza, Room 685
6707 Democracy Boulevard, MSC 5464
Bethesda, MD 20892 (by Fedex 20817)
Phone: (301) 594-8803
Email: karen.teff@nih.gov

Corinne M. Silva, Ph.D.
DEMD/NIDDK/NIH
Two Democracy Plaza, Room 794
6707 Democracy Boulevard, MSC 5464
Bethesda, MD 20892 (by Fedex 20817)
Phone: (301) 451-7335
Email: silvacm@mail.nih.gov

For questions concerning meeting logistics, contact:

John Hare, M.S., CMP, CGMP
The Scientific Consulting Group, Inc.
656 Quince Orchard Road, Suite 210
Gaithersburg, MD  20878
Phone:  (301) 670-4990
Fax:  (301) 670-3815
Email:  jhare@scgcorp.com