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Banner for the 2012 Chronic Kidney Disease Childhood to Adulthood Meeting.

Insights into CKD from the CKiD and CRIC Studies

Jan. 23 - 24, 2012 Location Contacts
Event Details Agenda

Event Details

Meeting Objectives

The NIDDK currently supports two large-scale, long-term observational studies of chronic kidney disease (CKD), the Chronic Kidney Disease in Children (CKiD)  Study and the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) Study, to address a wide range of scientific questions focused on prediction and mechanisms of CKD progression in both children and adults. In addition, a major focus of both studies is the set of clinical consequences arising from CKD including, but not limited to cardiovascular illness.

The NIDDK, in collaboration with the CKiD Study and CRIC Study investigators, will hold a workshop to discuss key recent published findings and emerging data from these landmark studies, including the results of a number of their ancillary studies. The workshop presentations made by study investigators also will highlight future opportunities for collaboration between these studies and among investigators in the broader CKD research community.

This 11/2 day workshop will include presentations on:

  • Keynote addresses on the burden of CKD in adults and children
  • The challenges of studying CKD over time
  • Key findings of the CRIC Study
  • Key findings of the CKiD Study
  • Methodological issues related to analysis of data from longitudinal CKD research studies
  • Opportunities for collaboration
  • Future research directions
The target audience for this colloquium includes:
  • Nephrologists and pediatric nephrologists
  • Researchers and other health care professionals with interest in CKD
  • Public health practitioners
  • The CRIC and CKiD investigators
  • Ancillary investigators to the CRIC and CKiD Studies
  • Foundation and professional society leadership
  • Journal editors

Also supported by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute and the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development.