Diabetes Statistics

This content describes the prevalence of diabetes and prediabetes in the United States.

Diabetes Facts and Statistics

Diabetes occurs when your blood glucose, also called blood sugar, is too high. High blood glucose can cause health problems over time. The main types of diabetes are type 1, type 2, and gestational. Learn more from the Diabetes Overview.

  • Total: An estimated 30.3 million people have diabetes (9.4 percent of the U.S. population)
  • Diagnosed: An estimated 23.1 million people have been diagnosed with diabetes (7.2 percent of the U.S. population)
  • Undiagnosed: An estimated 7.2 million adults, ages 18 years or older are undiagnosed (23.8 percent of people with diabetes)

View the full report: National Diabetes Statistics Report, 2017 (PDF, 1.35 MB) from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

Prediabetes Facts and Statistics

Prediabetes is a condition in which blood glucose or A1C levels—which reflect average blood glucose levels—are higher than normal but not high enough for a diagnosis of diabetes. People with prediabetes are at increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease, which can lead to heart attack or stroke. Learn more about prediabetes.

  • An estimated 84.1 million adults ages 18 years or older (33.9 percent of U.S. adults) have prediabetes
  • 23.1 million adults (48.3 percent) ages 65 or older have prediabetes.
  • More men (36.6 percent) than women (29.3 percent) have prediabetes.
  • The prevalence of prediabetes is similar among men and women across racial and ethnic groups.

View the full report: National Diabetes Statistics Report, 2017 (PDF, 1.35 MB) from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

Additional Reports on Diabetes

  • Diabetes in America 3rd edition provides comprehensive data on diabetes and its complications in the United States.
  • Maps of Trends in Diabetes and Obesity slides from the CDC show trends in the prevalence of obesity and diagnosed diabetes among U.S. adults from 1994-2015.
  • Diabetes and African Americans (from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ (HHS) Office of Minority Health) provides prevalence data on diabetes and African-Americans, including death rates, risk factors, and links to more information.
  • Diabetes and American Indians/Alaska Natives (from the HHS Office of Minority Health) provides prevalence data on diabetes in American Indians and Alaska Natives, including death rates, risk factors, and links to more information.
  • Diabetes and Asians and Pacific Islanders (from the HHS the Office of Minority Health) provides prevalence data on diabetes and Asian Americans and Pacific Islander Americans, including death rates, risk factors, and links to more information.
  • Diabetes and Hispanic Americans (from the HHS Office of Minority Health) provides prevalence data on diabetes in Hispanics/Latinos, including death rates, risk factors, and links to more information.
September 2017
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This content is provided as a service of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), part of the National Institutes of Health. The NIDDK translates and disseminates research findings through its clearinghouses and education programs to increase knowledge and understanding about health and disease among patients, health professionals, and the public. Content produced by the NIDDK is carefully reviewed by NIDDK scientists and other experts.