1. Home
  2. About NIDDK
  3. Staff Directory
  4. Kevin D. Hall, Ph.D.

Kevin D. Hall, Ph.D.

Photo of Kevin Hall
Scientific Focus Areas: Clinical Research, Computational Biology, Neuroscience

Professional Experience

  • Ph.D., McGill University, 1999

Current Research

My laboratory investigates how metabolism and the brain adapt in response to a variety of interventions to diet and physical activity. We perform experiments in both humans and rodents to better understand the complex mechanisms regulating macronutrient metabolism, body composition, and energy expenditure. A unique aspect of our laboratory involves the development of mathematical models to quantitatively describe, explain, integrate, and predict our experimental results.

Select Publications

Ultra-Processed Diets Cause Excess Calorie Intake and Weight Gain: An Inpatient Randomized Controlled Trial of Ad Libitum Food Intake.
Hall KD, Ayuketah A, Brychta R, Cai H, Cassimatis T, Chen KY, Chung ST, Costa E, Courville A, Darcey V, Fletcher LA, Forde CG, Gharib AM, Guo J, Howard R, Joseph PV, McGehee S, Ouwerkerk R, Raisinger K, Rozga I, Stagliano M, Walter M, Walter PJ, Yang S, Zhou M.
Cell Metab (2019 Jul 2) 30:226. Abstract/Full Text
Quantification of the effect of energy imbalance on bodyweight.
Hall KD, Sacks G, Chandramohan D, Chow CC, Wang YC, Gortmaker SL, Swinburn BA.
Lancet (2011 Aug 27) 378:826-37. Abstract/Full Text
View More Publications

Research in Plain Language

My laboratory studies the regulation of body weight and metabolism—the processes through which food is converted into the energy. We perform experiments in both humans and rodents to better understand the complex mechanisms that control

  • metabolism of macronutrients—proteins, fats, and carbohydrates;
  • food choice and eating behavior;
  • body weight and composition; and
  • energy expenditure, which is the amount of calories used to maintain life and perform physical work.

A unique aspect of our research group is that we develop mathematical models to describe, explain, integrate, and predict the results of our experiments.

Related Links