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  4. Christine Hsu, M.D.

Christine Hsu, M.D.

Professional Experience

  • Staff Clinician, Assistant Research Physician, NIDDK-Liver Disease Branch, 2022 – present
  • Transplant Hepatology Attending, Assistant Professor, Georgetown University, MedStar Georgetown Transplant Institute, 2017-2022
  • Transplant Hepatology Attending, Assistant Professor, University of Pennsylvania, Department of Gastroenterology, 2014-2017
  • Transplant Hepatology Fellowship, Columbia University-New York Presbyterian Hospital, 2013-2014
  • Gastroenterology and Hepatology Fellowship, Columbia University-New York Presbyterian Hospital, 2010-2013
  • Internal Medicine Residency, Boston University Medical Center, 2007-2010
  • M.D., Sidney Kimmel Medical College (Jefferson Medical College), 2007
  • B.S., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 2003

Current Research

My research is focused on improving outcomes in patients with alcoholic liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma. I am interested in biomarkers or modeling systems to improve prediction of clinical phenotypes in alcoholic liver disease and the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma with chronic liver disease. The overall goal is to advance personalized medicine for these liver patients.

Select Publications

Iron overload disorders.
Hsu CC, Senussi NH, Fertrin KY, Kowdley KV.
Hepatol Commun (2022 Aug) 6:1842-1854. Abstract/Full Text
Early Liver Transplantation for Severe Alcohol-Associated Hepatitis and a History of Prior Liver Decompensation.
Weinberg EM, Dukewich M, Jakhete N, Stonesifer E, Im GY, Lucey MR, Shetty K, Rice JP, Victor DW 3rd, Ghobrial MR, Shetty A, Rutledge SM, Florman SS, Hsu C, Shoreibah M, Aryan M, Orandi BJ, Han H, Terrault N, Lee BP.
Am J Gastroenterol (2022 Jul 11) Abstract/Full Text
View More Publications

Research in Plain Language

My research is focused at improving outcomes in patients with alcoholic liver disease and liver cancer. I am particularly interested blood tests (biomarkers) or models that help predict whether the alcoholic liver disease is likely to progress or to recover after alcohol cessation. I am also interested in ways to predict liver cancer risk in patients with chronic liver disease in hopes to improve early detection of liver cancer and prevent diagnosis at advanced disease where it may be associated with worse prognosis.