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Allen P. Minton, Ph.D.

Photo of Dr. Allen Minton
Scientific Focus Areas: Biomedical Engineering and Biophysics

Professional Experience

  • Distinguished Fellow, Jawaharlal Nehru Institute of Advanced Study, 2017
  • Fellow, Jawaharlal Nehru Institute of Advanced Study, 2014
  • Senior Biomedical Research Service, 2009
  • Senior Fellow, Japanese Society for the Promotion of Science, 2006
  • Visiting Professor, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2001
  • Visiting Professor, Osaka University, 1997
  • Chief, Section on Physical Biochemistry, NIDDK, 1992-2016
  • Visiting Professor, Science University of Tokyo, 1988
  • Chaim Weizmann Junior Fellow, Weizmann Institute of Science, 1968-1970
  • Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles, 1968
  • B.S., University of California, Los Angeles, 1964

Research Goal

Our goal is to understand how the kinetics and equilibria of specific biochemical reactions are affected by nonspecific interactions between reactant/product species and components of complex media resembling biological fluids and interfaces.

Current Research

We are engaged in theoretical and experimental studies of nonspecific solute-solute interactions — both attractive and repulsive — in solutions containing a high total concentration of macromolecules. Theoretical studies are based upon statistical-thermodynamic models. Experimental utilize measurements of sedimentation equilibrium, static and dynamic light scattering, circular dichroism, and fluorescence intensity and anisotropy.

Applying our Research

Detailed knowledge and understanding of the behavior of biological macromolecules in biological fluids would facilitate the design of more effective biopharmaceuticals.

Research in Plain Language

Biochemical reactions usually occur in fluid media. These fluids contain a high concentration of large molecules. The large molecules occupy a significant fraction of the fluid’s volume. Our research group studies how the “crowded” nature of the fluid affects the way particular molecules interact. We focus on how these fluids influence the rate and extent of biochemical reactions. Our group is also developing new methods to detect and measure these effects.

Research Images