Getting Help for Substance Use Disorders


Is someone you know using drugs or alcohol more often, in larger amounts, or for longer than intended? They may have a substance use disorder and need help finding treatment.

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DR. RODGERS: If someone you know is using drugs or alcohol more often, in larger amounts, or for longer than intended, it might be a sign they have a substance use disorder.

Hi, I’m Dr. Griffin Rodgers, director of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases at NIH.

My colleague, Dr. Nora Volkow, director of the National Institute on Drug Abuse, explains:

DR. VOLKOW: Addiction can change the brain, including the areas that are needed for self-control, making it very hard for someone to quit, even if they want to.

Substance use disorders can happen to anyone, and at any age. People with addiction might feel ashamed, fearful, or angry, and may not always tell the truth about their drug use. Treatment is available to people with substance use disorders, and those affected should be approached with high-quality care and with compassion.

DR. RODGERS: If you have questions or need help, call 1-800-622-HELP, and follow us @NIDDKgov. This is Dr. Griffin Rodgers.

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