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Indigestion (Dyspepsia)

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Definition and Facts

Indigestion is a general term that describes a group of gastrointestinal symptoms that occur together, including pain, a burning feeling, or discomfort in your upper abdomen; feeling full too soon while eating; and feeling uncomfortably full after eating.

Symptoms and Causes

Indigestion has many symptoms. You may have more than one symptom at the same time. Sometimes you may also have heartburn, which is a separate condition. Lifestyle, medicines, health problems, and digestive tract diseases can cause indigestion.

Diagnosis

Your doctor diagnoses indigestion based on your medical history, a physical exam, upper gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy, and other tests. These other tests include imaging tests, H. pylori testing, blood tests, stool tests, and urea breath tests.

Treatment

Treatment for indigestion depends on the cause and may include medicines, changes in what you eat and drink, and psychological therapies. In addition to changing what you eat and drink, you can help prevent indigestion by making certain lifestyle changes.

Eating, Diet, and Nutrition

You can help prevent indigestion by changing your diet. You may need to avoid certain foods and drinks that may cause indigestion, such as alcoholic drinks; carbonated drinks; coffee; foods that contain a lot of acid; and spicy, fatty, or greasy foods.

Clinical Trials

The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) and other components of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) conduct and support research into many diseases and conditions.

Related Diagnostic Tests

Your Digestive System and How it Works

The digestive system is made up of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract-also called the digestive tract-and the liver, pancreas, and the gallbladder. The GI tract is a series of hollow organs joined in a long, twisting tube from the mouth to the anus.

Related Research

This content is provided as a service of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), part of the National Institutes of Health. The NIDDK translates and disseminates research findings through its clearinghouses and education programs to increase knowledge and understanding about health and disease among patients, health professionals, and the public. Content produced by the NIDDK is carefully reviewed by NIDDK scientists and other experts.